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Easy stirrup pump

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Easy stirrup pump

Unread postAuthor: Gippeto » Sat Feb 23, 2008 9:22 pm

This is an easily constructed stirrup pump. It should be replicateable by most spudders out there. There is a pictorial on photobucket here;

http://s245.photobucket.com/albums/gg76 ... up%20pump/

Cost to build: About 20.00 for the pump and check valve. Another 10.00 for the manifold. Gage and valve belong to my work.

The original thread is here:

http://www.spudfiles.com/forums/easy-20 ... 13264.html

It has been brought to my attention that a suitable check valve exists and can be had at Lowes, Home Depot or plumbing suppliers. You might consider looking for them while getting the rest of the materials. To build or buy that is up to you.

edit: I had another look for these, a hard one. While I did find in-line checks, they were not the same as the one shown in the original thread. They had a bronze sealing face, and the spring was wrong ((spring pulls valve closed instead of pushes) this is a dead-space issue). If you decide to buy a check, make sure it at least has a soft (rubber) sealing face and a pressure rating equal to or greater than you need.

Not everyone may have access to these stores, so I will include instructions to build the check valve.

Material list:

3/4" copper tube one 25" piece and one 2" piece I used type M
One 3/4" tube to 3/4"NPT fitting
3/8" all thread rod 3 foot length
3/8" x 2" grade 5 bolt
(6) 3/8" flat washers
(1) 1/2" flat washer
(6) 3/8"nuts
(1) 3/8" threaded coupler (long nut)
(1) 3/8"od. x 1" length compression spring (a light one)
Fibreglass resin or other low viscosity (runny) epoxy
(1) 012 o-ring
(1) 114 o-ring
Red Loctite/5 min epoxy/jb weld/ etc. (any one, I had red loctite)

Tools required:

Drill press or (much more difficult) 3/8" hand drill and a willing friend to hold it
Metal file
Hacksaw
Tubing cutter
Torch, flux and solder or suitable HIGH strength epoxy
Wet/Dry sandpaper ~320 grit
Measuring tape
Marker (sharpie pen)

Update: My pump and check valve have been tested and proven (to my satisfaction) to 400psi.

Let's get started.
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Attachments
Basic parts.jpg
This is pretty much what you will need. If you bought a check valve, you won't need the copper fitting or other check valve parts.
Tube and mandrel for fitting washers.jpg
Measure, mark, cut and de-burr a 2" piece of 3/4" copper. Measure, mark and cut a 4" piece of all thread. This will be your mandrel, and then part of your piston.
Modified bolt and spring.jpg
Cut the head off of your 3/8" bolt. Thread a nut on and snug it down. Cut the threaded portion 1/8" out from the nut. Chuck it in the drill press and file the threads until the spring fits slightly loose. Remove from drill press. Place an 012 o-ring and 2 flat washers on the long end. Mark and cut here. Clean up the cut with the file and bevel the edge. File two flat spots on this end. (look at the pictorial if in doubt) Turn off the nut, apply Loctite or epoxy to seal the threads. Spin the nut back on, snug it, and clean off any excess Loctite or epoxy.
Fitting washers.jpg
Assemble (3) 3/8" flat washers on your mandrel between nuts. Use the drill press and file until the washers just fit into the tube.
Fitting and washer.jpg
File one 3/8" washer using your mandrel until it fits as shown.
Solder check valve to tube.jpg
Measure, mark, cut and de-burr a 25" piece of 3/4" copper tube. Properly prepare and solder the fitting, washer and tube together. Ask if you don't know how.
Last edited by Gippeto on Tue May 12, 2009 1:36 am, edited 6 times in total.
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Unread postAuthor: Novacastrian » Sat Feb 23, 2008 9:27 pm

Way to go Gippeto, not everyone would take the time to show us all that. :)
Nice file handle btw. :D
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Unread postAuthor: Gippeto » Sat Feb 23, 2008 10:09 pm

**** The pictures and instructions in this half are in the reverse order. I will fix this in the next day or so. I've already fixed the first half.


**** Use steel for the pump handle to avoid having it break while in use.



Pretty easy so far, huh?

It does not get harder.

Let's get back to work.
  • 0

Attachments
Finished pump.jpg
Use the coupler to attatch the piston to the remaining all thread. Insert into the tube, all the way. Mark for length. Make a suitable handle for your new pump. **EDIT**A fellow spudder was recently injured when the plastic handle on his store bought pump broke. Use steel for the handle...just to be safer. ***Use the mark you made to locate the washer on the underside of your handle. If desired, you can install 3/8"id polypropelene tubeing on the all thread. I lubed my pump with 10 weight oil.
Epoxy spring retainer in place.jpg
Put the 012 o-ring on your modified bolt(check pictorial if in doubt), place this into the fitting o-ring first, install spring and spring retainer. Check spring and retainer for center and straightness. Epoxy spring retainer in place. Let cure.
Marking and bending spring retainer.jpg
Cut a strip out of your piston mold about 5/16" wide. Clean up edges with the file. Mark center point and bend about 45 degrees. Place on fitting and mark as shown. Finish bending to "w" shape. This is your spring retainer.
Assembled showing air gap.jpg
Assemble your piston as shown. Check the length of the all thread. You want it to be recessed in the nut about 1/8". Trim all thread as neccessary. Apply loctite or epoxy to the threads, assemble to the correct air gap, and clean off any excess loctite or epoxy. Ensure that air passages are clear. Set aside to cure.
Filing air passage.jpg
File two flats opposite each other. Spin on a nut to check for depth. You should see a noticeable gap.
Tube removed. Looks good!.jpg
When the resin has fully cured, you can tap the piston out of the mold. Clean the grease from the piston and mold. Chuck the long end into the drill press and wet sand until the piston fits in the tube with a very small amount of clearance.
Turn nut down into resin.jpg
Mix your resin/epoxy as per manufacturers directions. Pour slowly into tube until about 3/16" from the top. Turn a nut down into the resin until the top of the nut is one washer thickness down. Add resin if needed to cover the nut. Add another filed down 3/8" flat washer to the top. Press it lightly down to contact the nut. Now, walk away and let the resin cure.
Resin, washer and nut.jpg
For the next step, have nearby (1) nut, (1) filed down 3/8"flat washer, small plliers (needle nose preferred)
Mixing cup and stir stick. A rag or paper towel for spills.
Install tube.jpg
Lightly grease the iside of the mold tube. Slide the mold tube over the turned down washer and into the silicone as shown. Check for straightness and center.
Add a bead of silicone.jpg
Add a bead of silicone as shown.
Rod, washers and nut ready.jpg
Assemble your mandrel as shown. Large washer on the bottom, filed down washer on top. Secure with nuts top and bottom. The bottom face of the filed down washer should be 5/8" from the end of the all thread.
Last edited by Gippeto on Fri Jul 24, 2009 7:11 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Unread postAuthor: Gippeto » Sat Feb 23, 2008 10:21 pm

Thank you Nova.

An exercise in backward thinking! :D

Yeah, golf balls have almost as many uses as WD-40. :lol:
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Unread postAuthor: frankrede » Sat Feb 23, 2008 10:26 pm

Great!
I like it, how much did it cost you in materials?
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Unread postAuthor: Killjoy » Sat Feb 23, 2008 10:52 pm

great how to, and excellent work on the pump. I know it will answer a lot of questions.
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Unread postAuthor: Pyro Ninja » Sat Feb 23, 2008 11:12 pm

"eff" Pretty much every picture uploaded using this site doesn't work for me. (Extremely irritating).
(From what I hear) I am sure this design will be used extensively by many members, good job
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Unread postAuthor: bluerussetboy » Sun Feb 24, 2008 11:41 am

nice tutorial. :)

i definitely like the way you put your spring retainer together.

very cool
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Unread postAuthor: Gippeto » Mon Feb 25, 2008 2:56 pm

Thank you.
I have updated the top post with cost, etc. The pump and check are working perfectly, and I have satisfied myself that it is safe to 400psi. (see original post for details)
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Unread postAuthor: bluerussetboy » Mon Feb 25, 2008 3:15 pm

And how much do you have to weigh for that 400 psi???
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Unread postAuthor: pizlo » Mon Feb 25, 2008 3:32 pm

With the Oring setup you have, wouldn't a floating Oring be easy to use.
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Unread postAuthor: Gippeto » Mon Feb 25, 2008 6:52 pm

Somewhat more than the average 12 year old. :lol:

Pizlo, are you referring to the piston? If so, it is a floating o-ring. The air gap is small, but it is there.
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Unread postAuthor: Antonio » Sun Mar 30, 2008 1:48 pm

Nice job man. I like it:) I guess all I gotta do now is get into the epoxy stuff, lol.
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Unread postAuthor: Gippeto » Sun Mar 30, 2008 4:58 pm

Thanks. Epoxy can be very useful, and should never be dismissed outright.

I used it to prevent the washers from digging into the pump cylinder. If you have another way to accomplish this, by all means try it.

It is the principles which matter, not the execution. :)
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Unread postAuthor: Velocity » Sun Mar 30, 2008 5:25 pm

I did some quick calculations, and for my weight (130 lbs), I think I would be able to generate about 300 PSI. I just used the equation pressure = force/area; not sure if I forgot to account for something.
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