Login    Register
User Information
Username:
Password:
We are a free and open
community, all are welcome.
Click here to Register
Sponsored
Who is online

In total there are 17 users online :: 3 registered, 0 hidden and 14 guests


Most users ever online was 106 on Sat Jun 14, 2014 4:35 pm

Registered users: Bing [Bot], Google [Bot], Yahoo [Bot] based on users active over the past 5 minutes

The Team
Administrators
Global Moderators
global_moderators.png CS

Step by step to building a cheap oak stock

Come find a how-to on how to do something, or come write your own for other people.
Sponsored 
  • Author
    Message

Step by step to building a cheap oak stock

Unread postAuthor: jook13 » Mon Mar 16, 2009 1:27 am

Not to long ago, I made a copper coaxal gunand added a little stock on it. The stock proved to be popular, even though it was a little afterthought. Anyways, someone mentioned that a step by step would go over well, so here we are. Reading my attempt at a "how to".

Firstly, I have to apologize to the fact that a few pictures were deleted from my camera. My 2 year old girl loved to push buttons (usually mine). Secondly I have to state that I am no expert on this subject. This is my second attempt at a wood stock and I have limited tools, So I consider this more of an "explanation on how I did it" and not so much a "this is how it IS done". Make sense?

So anyways, I started out looking for a piece of wood. My last one was just a simple piece of pine (house building lumber). I wanted better. I looked into oak and was scared away by the prices. a 2 inch by 2 inch by 36 inch chunk was 38 bucks at my local Lowes. Too small and still about 40 bucks? I then came up with the idea of laminating 2- 1x10 inch chuncks together. One by six or eight would have been fine, but I had the ten inch stuff in my garage from some other project. Three foot sections of 1x6 should be in the 10 dollar range each if you go to Lowes or Home Depot.

So anyways, To laminate 2 pieces together, make sure both sided that are being glued together are cleaned, I just used a wet rag to wipe them. Then using another rag and a good amount of wood glue, cover One side with a thin layer of the wood glue. Apply the pieces of wood together and then clamp them tight. Leave them clamped for how ever long the bottle of glue states, mine says to leave clamped 30 minutes.

Image

After the glue sets up, It is time to Draw out the shape. I held my coaxal in place and then went to town with a pencil. The pencil was great because it is light. Once I got the pencil drawing worked out, I did a darker marker line of the general shape. As for the distance from the butt of the stock to the trigger, I just copied my BB gun at 13 inches from the butt to the trigger.

Image

Depending on your tools, this next step is either much easier of much more difficult. I used a skillsaw and sawzall since that is all I had (a framers cutting tools). A band saw or even a jigsaw would have been way faster and easier. Oh well, doing this by hand would have taken a lot longer. So for me it was cut out what I could with skillsaw, finish with sawzall. I also drilled a hole for the start of my thumbhole. The biggest drill bit I had was 7/8 inch. I wish I had 1 1/2 inch.

Image

Image

From here on out, its all about how much time you want to put into it (determined by tools on hand sadly). I did find that a hammer and chisel is the quickest way to get a ROUGH shape of what you want. Chisel the shape you want and dont worry too much about how rough it looks, sandpaper is amazing stuff. This is the start of my thumbhole after a bunch of chisel work.

Image

This is the area I have to apologize for the lack of pictures. At least I think words should cover the basics. Once the basic shape is there, it is time to start smoothing out those rough edges. If you have a belt sander, use the crap out of it. If you have a round file, use it in the tight areas (a threaded bolt works well on wood). Use your best judgement as far as how aggressive the grit of paper to use. Start out with rough and work your way towards really fine.

For the groove that the gun fits in, dont worry about making it a perfect half circle. Once the pipe is installed, nobody will see the hard work that went into making that. just make a square groove that is the width of the pipe and half as deep.
Image
Only worry about making the half circle detail at the very ends of the stock where the pipe exits and it is visible.

Where the blowgun goes through the stock, I used a 5/8 paddle drill bit and cored the hell out of the area. You will be surprised at how much wood materiel needs to be taken out for a simple blowgun.

Sand and finish to your liking, this will probably take a while.

Image
Image

To get ready to stain it (if you choose to), I screwed a screw in the groove where the barrel sits. I tied a piece of string to the end of the screw and hung it from the ceiling so as to not worry about finger prints or setting the finished product in dirt or dust before it dries.

Image

After properly applying any need drop cloth to prevent a mess, apply the stain of your choice using a rag you dont mind throwing away in a bit. One or two coats and you are ready to let it set. Then all you have to do is find a clean way to apply the gun to the stock.

Image
  • 0

I like to play blackjack. I'm not addicted to gambling, I'm addicted to sitting in a semi-circle.
User avatar
jook13
Lieutenant Colonel
Lieutenant Colonel
 
Posts: 434
Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 10:39 pm
Location: Prescott Arizona
Reputation: 0

Unread postAuthor: jackssmirkingrevenge » Mon Mar 16, 2009 1:40 am

Nice little how-to, I think you understated the amount of work that goes into finishing it but the effect is worthwhile. Personally I'd be more inclined to build up a stock and paint it, but for the more traditional types hacking it out of a piece of timber is the way to go, kudos.
  • 0

User avatar
jackssmirkingrevenge
Donating Member
Donating Member
 
Posts: 23938
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2007 11:28 pm
Location: epoxy batcave
Reputation: 50

Unread postAuthor: inonickname » Mon Mar 16, 2009 2:25 am

This is brilliant. Most people should be able to reproduce something like this. I think I may even have to go buy one of those blowguns and make a similar co-ax.

Thanks :D
  • 0

PimpAssasinG wrote:no im strong but you are a fat gay mother sucker that gets raped by black man for fun
User avatar
inonickname
Lieutenant General
Lieutenant General
 
Posts: 2606
Joined: Sun Dec 07, 2008 3:27 am
Reputation: 0

Unread postAuthor: jook13 » Mon Mar 16, 2009 2:26 am

Building a stock up then painting it would be less trouble. I just love the look of a traditional wooden stock. I certainly did understate the trouble it is to make a nice finish. HOURS of sanding.

I hope this inspires more to make a nice finished stock for their spud gun, especially those small bore "snipers" out there. I dont see enough on this site.
  • 0

I like to play blackjack. I'm not addicted to gambling, I'm addicted to sitting in a semi-circle.
User avatar
jook13
Lieutenant Colonel
Lieutenant Colonel
 
Posts: 434
Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 10:39 pm
Location: Prescott Arizona
Reputation: 0

Unread postAuthor: jackssmirkingrevenge » Mon Mar 16, 2009 2:33 am

It certainly inspired me to order a couple of blowguns, I really need to make some proper ergonomic co-axials.

As to the stock finishing, a dremel type rotary tool would certainly make the job much easier and less time consuming.
  • 0

User avatar
jackssmirkingrevenge
Donating Member
Donating Member
 
Posts: 23938
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2007 11:28 pm
Location: epoxy batcave
Reputation: 50

Unread postAuthor: inonickname » Mon Mar 16, 2009 4:54 am

When I build one, I'll probably just build it up with ply then fibreglass it, but I'll still use a similar method. (unless I can get some nice wood..)
  • 0

PimpAssasinG wrote:no im strong but you are a fat gay mother sucker that gets raped by black man for fun
User avatar
inonickname
Lieutenant General
Lieutenant General
 
Posts: 2606
Joined: Sun Dec 07, 2008 3:27 am
Reputation: 0

Unread postAuthor: daniel323 » Mon Mar 23, 2009 7:14 pm

How would you make the half circle the chamber fits in?
  • 0

User avatar
daniel323
Corporal
Corporal
 
Posts: 71
Joined: Sat Jan 31, 2009 11:21 pm
Location: Salina,Ks
Reputation: 0

Sponsored

Sponsor
 


Unread postAuthor: jook13 » Mon Mar 23, 2009 8:04 pm

Depends on the tools you have on hand. I had a skill saw and chisel. What I did was set my skill saw depth for half the diameter of the pipe. I then clamped the stock in a vise and cut (scored) a bunch of grooves that were have as deep as the diameter with my skill saw. I then used a chisel to chip lines of wood that were left over. The groove doesnt have to be a half circle because nobody will see it. I just made sure to stop my skill saw cuts a few inches away from the end of the stock so I could take the time to chisel and sand (as JSR mentioned, a dremel would have been awesome for this) that last section where the pipe leaves the stock into a nice half circle.

The easiest and quickest way to go about it would be a router with the correct bit. Most routers have an attachment that lets you guid it in a straight line. Problem is I dont have one. A table saw would have made this job a bit easier as well.
  • 0

I like to play blackjack. I'm not addicted to gambling, I'm addicted to sitting in a semi-circle.
User avatar
jook13
Lieutenant Colonel
Lieutenant Colonel
 
Posts: 434
Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 10:39 pm
Location: Prescott Arizona
Reputation: 0

Unread postAuthor: Xtazz » Mon Mar 23, 2009 8:17 pm

Woha, I just found my master !
Real respect to your job
  • 0

The D4 - French air cannon - 12mm barell
[url]http://www.spudfiles.com/forums/d4-french-air-cannon-caliber-12mm-t17748.html
[/url]

Xtazz
Private
Private
 
Posts: 18
Joined: Mon Mar 23, 2009 3:01 pm
Reputation: 0

Unread postAuthor: jook13 » Mon Mar 23, 2009 10:59 pm

Heh. Master...

Thanks for the props (compliments).
  • 0

I like to play blackjack. I'm not addicted to gambling, I'm addicted to sitting in a semi-circle.
User avatar
jook13
Lieutenant Colonel
Lieutenant Colonel
 
Posts: 434
Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 10:39 pm
Location: Prescott Arizona
Reputation: 0

Unread postAuthor: jackssmirkingrevenge » Tue Mar 24, 2009 1:03 am

jook13 wrote:Thanks for the props


*confused French accent* Mon dieu, what is zis? Ah do not rehmember supplyeeng ze air screw to 'im!

sorry

:D :D :D
  • 0

User avatar
jackssmirkingrevenge
Donating Member
Donating Member
 
Posts: 23938
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2007 11:28 pm
Location: epoxy batcave
Reputation: 50

Unread postAuthor: Sparkie » Sat Apr 25, 2009 12:11 am

Looks like I have found how to make my stock. Brilliantly done.
  • 0

User avatar
Sparkie
Corporal
Corporal
 
Posts: 62
Joined: Wed Dec 26, 2007 3:41 am
Reputation: 0

Unread postAuthor: SPG » Sat Apr 25, 2009 4:47 am

Great looking stock, but if I could through in a quicky, it's much easier to groove the stock for your "mechanicals" if you don't glue it together first.

The absolute simplest way is to use three bits of timber not two. You can then cut the middle one to the right size for all your internals first, and then glue or screw or bolt the whole lot together after.

Personally I've usually bolted together, as it means you can get in again if you need to, and also it means if in your carving you make a cock up on one side, you can start again. Go to your local hardware store and look at door fixtures and fittings there's lots of useful screw/bolts there, usually in a good range of finishes.
  • 0

<A HREF="http://www.paisleypeking.co.uk"><IMG BORDER="0" WIDTH="400" HEIGHT="64" SRC="http://www.paisleypeking.co.uk/images/signature.gif"></A>
User avatar
SPG
Major
Major
 
Posts: 364
Joined: Thu Feb 09, 2006 11:55 am
Reputation: 0

Unread postAuthor: jook13 » Sat Apr 25, 2009 1:11 pm

SPG wrote:Great looking stock, but if I could through in a quicky, it's much easier to groove the stock for your "mechanicals" if you don't glue it together first.

The absolute simplest way is to use three bits of timber not two. You can then cut the middle one to the right size for all your internals first, and then glue or screw or bolt the whole lot together after.

Personally I've usually bolted together, as it means you can get in again if you need to, and also it means if in your carving you make a cock up on one side, you can start again. Go to your local hardware store and look at door fixtures and fittings there's lots of useful screw/bolts there, usually in a good range of finishes.


You do bring up a very good point.

I think one of the biggest points I wanted to get across was the idea of laminating 2 pieces of wood together because it is much cheaper then paying for a thicker chunk of wood, and after cutting and sanding, it is VERY tough to see the seam.

Your idea of using 3 pieces is very sound. It would be tougher with my application due to my barrel being a different diameter then the chamber. If my coaxal chamber extended the whole length of the stock, that idea would work great.

I still think using a correctly sized router bit and finding a way to guide it straight would be the ultimate way to do it.
  • 0

I like to play blackjack. I'm not addicted to gambling, I'm addicted to sitting in a semi-circle.
User avatar
jook13
Lieutenant Colonel
Lieutenant Colonel
 
Posts: 434
Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 10:39 pm
Location: Prescott Arizona
Reputation: 0

Unread postAuthor: Brian the brain » Sun Apr 26, 2009 1:22 am

I used just one piece for the schoulderstock and two sideplates to lock in the mechanical stuff... :wink:

I used a gardening saw ( the folding kind) to shape everything to a sanding finish.
I bent it to cut out the cheekrest shape.

When you place it on the wood at the right angle, eventhough it is a very crude tool, you can swiftly form the wood with accuracy...


I also recommend using a woodplane to round everything off more consistently.


Nice How-to!!!
  • 0

Gun Freak wrote:
Oh my friggin god stop being so awesome, that thing is pure kick ass. Most innovative and creative pneumatic that the files have ever come by!

Can't ask for a better compliment!!
User avatar
Brian the brain
Moderator
Moderator
 
Posts: 3374
Joined: Mon Dec 05, 2005 2:06 am
Location: Holland
Reputation: 13

Next

Return to How-To Guide Database

Who is online

Registered users: Bing [Bot], Google [Bot], Yahoo [Bot]

Reputation System ©'