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“NO DRILL” Sprinkler Valve Pneumatic Modification

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Unread postAuthor: bigotry2 » Thu Jul 05, 2007 12:11 am

Well today when I mixed it up it was like 25 degrees celcius outside. So its pretty hot for where I live (Canada Alberta). But I was inside, so maybe its a bit cooler.. But still nowhere NEAR the pooling capabilities as I'm seeing in these photos. :(

I'll take a photo of my JB Welding and you'll see what I mean. Its messy. I use a toothpick to manipulate it in tight spaces, which is why you can imagine I desire the pooling effect so badly.
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Unread postAuthor: MrCrowley » Thu Jul 05, 2007 12:14 am

Hmm that is strange. I use a flat head screw driver to apply mine. Just stir it alot i guess
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Unread postAuthor: bigotry2 » Thu Jul 05, 2007 12:22 am

I'm reading the website FAQ of J-B Weld and they say you can add lacquer or paint thinner to it and it will make it less viscous.

If I was rich and had access to a machine shop or something, I'd machine an entire gun out of J-B weld. Look at the strengths on this crap..

Properties (psi)
Tensile Strength: 3960
Adhesion: 1800
Flex Strength: 7320
Tensile Lap Shear: 1040
Shrinkage: 0.0%
Resistant to: 500° F
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Unread postAuthor: MrCrowley » Thu Jul 05, 2007 12:41 am

Yeah but it has a habbit of cracking when hit hard enough. Which is not very hard at all.
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Cool!

Unread postAuthor: MR. E » Sat Sep 29, 2007 11:27 pm

This is great I came to this site because this pneumatic valve thing for air guns looked fairly interesting. Well I did the sprinkler system in my yard two years ago and would you guess what exact valves it used? Thats right the same exact brand and type as this pictures. Well, one of these happened to go bad this summer, I bet you can guess what is going to happen to it next spring! :D
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Re: Cool!

Unread postAuthor: hi » Sat Sep 29, 2007 11:35 pm

MR. E wrote:This is great I came to this site because this pneumatic valve thing for air guns looked fairly interesting. Well I did the sprinkler system in my yard two years ago and would you guess what exact valves it used? Thats right the same exact brand and type as this pictures. Well, one of these happened to go bad this summer, I bet you can guess what is going to happen to it next spring! :D


THATS THE SPIRIT!
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Unread postAuthor: frankrede » Sun Sep 30, 2007 12:03 am

bigotry2 wrote:I'm reading the website FAQ of J-B Weld and they say you can add lacquer or paint thinner to it and it will make it less viscous.

If I was rich and had access to a machine shop or something, I'd machine an entire gun out of J-B weld. Look at the strengths on this crap..

Properties (psi)
Tensile Strength: 3960
Adhesion: 1800
Flex Strength: 7320
Tensile Lap Shear: 1040
Shrinkage: 0.0%
Resistant to: 500° F

If you had access to a machine shop, you would make an entire gun out of something cheaper, more accesable, and stronger.
Steel, aluminum, stainless, you catch my drift? bigot?
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Re: Cool!

Unread postAuthor: MR. E » Sun Oct 07, 2007 11:11 pm

hi wrote:
MR. E wrote:This is great I came to this site because this pneumatic valve thing for air guns looked fairly interesting. Well I did the sprinkler system in my yard two years ago and would you guess what exact valves it used? Thats right the same exact brand and type as this pictures. Well, one of these happened to go bad this summer, I bet you can guess what is going to happen to it next spring! :D


THATS THE SPIRIT!


Thanks!
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Unread postAuthor: AussieSniper » Tue Jun 01, 2010 7:51 pm

i see you removed the guider rod inside to valve, I've see that this may screw it up because certain diaphrams wont sit back their normal position correctly. Have you had any problems like that so far?
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Unread postAuthor: Hubb » Tue Jun 01, 2010 10:13 pm

Despite the fact that this is a dead topic, I feel inclined to post an answer.

This sprinkler valve is different than a conventional inline one (that you are probably referencing to). This type of valve is what's called a flow control sprinkler valve. It's pretty neat, actually.

The guide rod in a conventional sprinkler valve is used to not only guide the diaphragm, but is also used as a makeshift equalization port. By removing it in a this valve, it essentially enlarges the equalization hole too much, causing unnecessary modifications to be done in order for the valve to function properly.

In a flow control type valve (anti-siphon valves aside), the guide rod acts as more of a stopper for the diaphragm. It is used to essentially regulate the flow of the fluid. By removing this guide rod (as was done in the OP), it will allow for maximum flow.

Make sense? Basically, it's the same, only different.

And thanks for posting in this thread to bring it back near top. The several years I've been here, I've never seen it. It has reminded me that I should have covered flow control valves in The Sprinkler Valve. I'll get it updated as soon as possible.
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