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9-volt batteries...

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Unread postAuthor: Hydra » Wed Mar 26, 2008 3:01 am

9 Volt Batteries taste like lemons. Lick the metal bit where it connects to something.
Sorry for the pointless post.
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Unread postAuthor: rcman50166 » Wed Mar 26, 2008 5:35 am

you probably wanna look at the java on this site.
http://physics.bu.edu/~duffy/semester2/d11_loop_rule.html

I think it proves my point very nicley.
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Unread postAuthor: TurboSuper » Wed Mar 26, 2008 5:41 am

rcman50166 wrote:you probably wanna look at the java on this site.
http://physics.bu.edu/~duffy/semester2/d11_loop_rule.html

I think it proves my point very nicley.


I'm not sure what your "point" is but lets end this silly argument here:

Resistors in parallel divide current, resistors in series divide voltage.

Everyone clear now?

P.S: I think a big misconception is the difference between "voltage drop" and "voltage reduction". Although in a basic DC circuit they're the same thing, people who have experiences with amplifiers and attenuators will say they're somewhat different.
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Unread postAuthor: rcman50166 » Wed Mar 26, 2008 9:05 am

Almost. Parallel circuits divide current, not necesarrily resistors in the branch. If you split the path, the current splits and if you add a resistor the voltage drops. Argument complete. :D
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Unread postAuthor: scottcrete » Wed Mar 26, 2008 9:16 am

just to let you know.. a rayovac battery.. on their site.. says the 9 volt is 650 ma..
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Unread postAuthor: dewey-1 » Wed Mar 26, 2008 9:31 am

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Unread postAuthor: paaiyan » Wed Mar 26, 2008 10:24 pm

dewey-1 wrote:
jimmy101 wrote:
paaiyan said:
Does anyone know how many amps the current from a 9-volt carries? I know amperage and voltage are inversely proportional.

Basically I need to know what kind of voltage I would need to reach to get the amperes down to, say, .003.

Common dude, get an f'in clue. What kind of responses do you expect for such a stupid question. If you meant using an inductor why the hell didn't you say so?

Common people, if you ask a question please try to supply enough f'in information so that people can respond. Lame ass questions like this just piss us old farts off. Get you head out of your ass and read your post before you hit the submit button. Is there enough info to get the answer you need. Have you described what you are doing in enough detail?

Damn, I'g getting cranky.

:twisted:


jimmy;

I agree completely, after my first response to his question I still did not know what he was trying to accomplish.

Hence I did not proceed with any more possible solutions because I had no clue what he was asking. I did not have the heart to make a statement like you did jimmy. Guess I better not try to be nice to some of these indecisive questions.

Hopefully he can rephrase his question(s) to something that is more concise.

Amen to pissing us old farts off!


Pissing you old farts off? I've been here longer than you, and I have more posts than you.

I gave you as much information as I thought you needed. Voltage and amperage are inversely proportional, I needed to know what kind of voltage I'd need to reach to get that many amps, end of story. Doesn't matter how I planned on doing it, and it doesn't matter what I was trying to accomplish.

Daegurth, thank you.
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Unread postAuthor: jimmy101 » Thu Mar 27, 2008 12:38 pm

paaiyan wrote:Pissing you old farts off? I've been here longer than you, and I have more posts than you.

So? How many posts did you have at Spudtech? Besides, who gives an f' how many posts you have.

paaiyan wrote:I gave you as much information as I thought you needed. Voltage and amperage are inversely proportional, I needed to know what kind of voltage I'd need to reach to get that many amps, end of story. Doesn't matter how I planned on doing it, and it doesn't matter what I was trying to accomplish.

You were wrong, that was not enough info for that type of EE question. What you do with the voltage and current affects how you need to generate it. In general, voltage and amperage are not inversely proportional. Only when power is constant are voltage and amperage inversely proportional, and even then they aren't always.
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Unread postAuthor: starman » Thu Mar 27, 2008 1:05 pm

jimmy101 wrote:You were wrong, that was not enough info for that type of EE question. What you do with the voltage and current affects how you need to generate it. In general, voltage and amperage are not inversely proportional. Only when power is constant are voltage and amperage inversely proportional, and even then they aren't always.

Agreed.... like what I said earlier
starman wrote:When you step up voltage through a transformer, the Voltage*current (edit: Power) relationship stays the same (minus efficiency losses).

Same applies when you step down voltage. Of course, this applies to AC signals only, for any non-EE types here. DC cannot traverse an induction (coil) transformer.
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Unread postAuthor: dewey-1 » Thu Mar 27, 2008 1:40 pm

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Unread postAuthor: jimmy101 » Thu Mar 27, 2008 2:06 pm

dewey-1 wrote:Now close the switch, stick your tongue on the coil HV terminal and one hand on the battery - terminal and have someone open the closed switch.

Now tell me that DC can not transverse an induction (coil) transformer.

That ain't DC, its AC.

Anytime the voltage changes with time you have an AC circuit and all the affects of AC apply. Switching a DC power source on or off creates an AC source.

Coils (transformers, inductors ...) work just fine with a switched DC source because a switched DC source isn't DC, it's AC.
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Unread postAuthor: TurboSuper » Thu Mar 27, 2008 5:31 pm

Yup, Jimmy's got it right. In a pure DC environment, an inductor will just act as a resistor with the value of whatever winding resistance it has.
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Unread postAuthor: dewey-1 » Fri Mar 28, 2008 9:16 am

jimmy101 wrote:
dewey-1 wrote:Now close the switch, stick your tongue on the coil HV terminal and one hand on the battery - terminal and have someone open the closed switch.

Now tell me that DC can not transverse an induction (coil) transformer.

That ain't DC, its AC.

Anytime the voltage changes with time you have an AC circuit and all the affects of AC apply. Switching a DC power source on or off creates an AC source.

Coils (transformers, inductors ...) work just fine with a switched DC source because a switched DC source isn't DC, it's AC.


jimmy;

You are correct, I stand to be corrected. In my over simplification of the example circuit I should have stated a pulsed or switched DC source.
Like you stated; all DC powered circuits will have an AC component (characteristic) created. That component is always present at initial power on and power off.
Sorry for any confusion I may have created.
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Unread postAuthor: scottcrete » Fri Mar 28, 2008 9:23 am

wow.. I ONLY THOUGHT YOU GUYS COMPLAINED ABOUT MY POSTS..

seems as if you complain about everything.. even 9 volt batterys..lol

(no body take offese to that now.. (just a joke)
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