Login    Register
User Information
Username:
Password:
We are a free and open
community, all are welcome.
Click here to Register
Sponsored
Who is online

In total there are 46 users online :: 4 registered, 0 hidden and 42 guests


Most users ever online was 218 on Wed Dec 07, 2016 6:58 pm

Registered users: al-xg, Bing [Bot], Google [Bot], Yahoo [Bot] based on users active over the past 5 minutes

The Team
Administrators
Global Moderators
global_moderators.png CS

Getting into arc welding

All non-spudgun related discussion goes here such as projects, theories, serious questions, etc. All "off-topic" posts (aka useless posting, determined by moderators) will be removed.
Sponsored 
  • Author
    Message

Getting into arc welding

Unread postAuthor: A a r o n » Fri May 22, 2009 11:06 pm

I want to get an arc welder so I can build stuff. I learned some basic stuff in a high school metal working class last year.

Would this be a good welder for a beginner?
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber=97717
  • 0

User avatar
A a r o n
Specialist
Specialist
 
Posts: 55
Joined: Sat Jul 07, 2007 3:23 pm
Location: NJ
Reputation: 0

Unread postAuthor: kiwi of nitro » Fri May 22, 2009 11:31 pm

Horror Freight usually sells crap, I would not suggest buying anything from them.
  • 0

User avatar
kiwi of nitro
Corporal
Corporal
 
Posts: 77
Joined: Sun Aug 31, 2008 9:42 pm
Reputation: 0

Unread postAuthor: Technician1002 » Fri May 22, 2009 11:42 pm

kiwi of nitro wrote:Horror Freight usually sells crap, I would not suggest buying anything from them.


Need to give examples. They sell inexpensive stuff. It is not the same quality as Craftsman and Snap On. On a budget, much of their stuff is servicable.

I have one of the $40 drill presses (crap but functional) and a small compressor that will work on my car inverter. Meets spec, but undersize which is OK as it will run on my undersize power source.

For those learning and can deal with the K Mart of tools, it's OK. If he was looking for a Pro Welder, I would steer him to something industrial duty.

Edit, be aware of the duty cycle of that welder. It is light duty and the current is not high enough for any heavy work. I learned on a 250 Amp welder. I don't think I have ever welded anything on that low of current. it may be OK for muffler and tailpipe repairs but useless for 1/4 inch steel plate. That welder is for 18 gauge to 1/8th inch.

Most stick welding is done between 40 and 225 amps depending on the penetration needed. Pick a welder to meet your requirements.
  • 0

Attachments
FieldPower.jpg
Harbor Freight 3 gallon 1/3 HP compressor filling the big cannon.
User avatar
Technician1002
Chief of Staff
Chief of Staff
 
Posts: 5190
Joined: Sat Apr 04, 2009 11:10 am
Reputation: 14

Unread postAuthor: hi » Sat May 23, 2009 12:12 am

I would suggest getting a used Lincoln electric on eBay or a similar site. They are great welders and will allow you to weld thicker metal. 70 amps isn't very much for an arc welder. its takes about 115 amps to weld 1/4 mild steel.

I'm also in a welding class at my high school and have experience with arc welding. trust me when I say that you should get quality equipment, it pays off in the long run.
  • 0

"physics, gravity, and law enforcement are the only things that prevent me from operating at my full potential" - not sure, but i like the quote

you know you are not an engineer if you have to remind yourself "left loosy righty tighty"
User avatar
hi
Major General
Major General
 
Posts: 1619
Joined: Thu Feb 01, 2007 9:28 pm
Reputation: 0

Unread postAuthor: Technician1002 » Sat May 23, 2009 12:17 am

hi wrote:I would suggest getting a used Lincoln electric on eBay or a similar site. They are great welders and will allow you to weld thicker metal. 70 amps isn't very much for an arc welder. its takes about 115 amps to weld 1/4 mild steel.

I'm also in a welding class at my high school and have experience with arc welding. trust me when I say that you should get quality equipment, it pays off in the long run.


On consideration for students and other non home owners, they may be limited in power to a 120 volt circuit instead of a 30 amp 240 volt outlet.

It is a big reason I went with gas welding instead. I have a full selection of tips, a cutting torch and can braze, weld, cut, etc, and isn't limited to the location power.
  • 0

User avatar
Technician1002
Chief of Staff
Chief of Staff
 
Posts: 5190
Joined: Sat Apr 04, 2009 11:10 am
Reputation: 14

Unread postAuthor: Carlman » Sat May 23, 2009 6:06 am

I purchased a Cigweld 140amp turbo pro arc welder about a year ago and it has given me no problems and i use it 3 - 4 times a week on various things.

Cigweld or Lincoln are the ones to go for.
  • 0

Image
Aussie spudders unite!!
User avatar
Carlman
Major General
Major General
 
Posts: 1618
Joined: Sat Nov 24, 2007 1:18 am
Location: Western Australia
Reputation: 0

Unread postAuthor: inonickname » Sat May 23, 2009 7:40 am

I can say that your better of with a MIG welder. Though there's not too much wrong with arc welders though.

We have a magmate, and I can say that they are very good. (it's MIG, and has a lot more than 70 amps, but still good, and not too expensive). As far as arcs go I don't have many suggestions, but that one has a very low duty cycle and underpowered as far as amperage goes. Try get one with a higher duty cycle and more amperage to really drive thicker tips into thicker metal.

If you have a squiz around instructables, people have made arcs from MOT's, but I wouldn't bother.

You want more duty cycle, otherwise you'll be waitin for the thing for a long time.

Also consider oxy-fuel welding/brazing. There are other options such as TIG welding but they may be slightly out of reach for you.
  • 0

PimpAssasinG wrote:no im strong but you are a fat gay mother sucker that gets raped by black man for fun
User avatar
inonickname
Lieutenant General
Lieutenant General
 
Posts: 2606
Joined: Sun Dec 07, 2008 3:27 am
Reputation: 0

Sponsored

Sponsor
 


Unread postAuthor: Carlman » Sat May 23, 2009 8:09 am

I prefer acrs as its easy to get a good weld with and you end up with a much stronger weld, not to mention not having to pay for gas. (gasless migs suck)
  • 0

Image
Aussie spudders unite!!
User avatar
Carlman
Major General
Major General
 
Posts: 1618
Joined: Sat Nov 24, 2007 1:18 am
Location: Western Australia
Reputation: 0

Unread postAuthor: inonickname » Sat May 23, 2009 8:14 am

Carlman wrote:I prefer acrs as its easy to get a good weld with and you end up with a much stronger weld, not to mention not having to pay for gas. (gasless migs suck)


I don't agree. I started out using a MIG before arcs, and I find neither easier as I have excellent dexterity. I believe either can make a satisfactory weld, though TIG undoubtedly beats them both.

Not paying for gas is good, though you still have sticks to use up.
  • 0

PimpAssasinG wrote:no im strong but you are a fat gay mother sucker that gets raped by black man for fun
User avatar
inonickname
Lieutenant General
Lieutenant General
 
Posts: 2606
Joined: Sun Dec 07, 2008 3:27 am
Reputation: 0

Unread postAuthor: far_cry » Sat May 23, 2009 8:46 am

china is starting to manufacturer human beans
  • 0

ImageImage
User avatar
far_cry
Donating Member
Donating Member
 
Posts: 317
Joined: Wed Aug 20, 2008 3:59 pm
Reputation: 0

Unread postAuthor: Carlman » Sat May 23, 2009 11:03 am

And then you have wire to use, each to his own i suppose. Arc takes more skill to master, thats why i enjoy it. i was doing an appprentiship as a boilermaker and didnt find it exiting enough as all i had to do was set the thing and pull a trigger basically. But anyway...
  • 0

Image
Aussie spudders unite!!
User avatar
Carlman
Major General
Major General
 
Posts: 1618
Joined: Sat Nov 24, 2007 1:18 am
Location: Western Australia
Reputation: 0

Unread postAuthor: USGF » Sat May 23, 2009 2:13 pm

Bang for the dollar, it'll be hard to beat an arc stick welder. As Tech and others mention, a Lincoln, Miller, Sears etc buzz box can be found at garage sales or on Ebay. Don't forget flea markets and swap meets. Stick to brand name stuff. Use 3/32" rod if you lack power, 1/8" for best selection of rods. You can weld Aluminum, stainless, steel etc. simply by swapping rods. Not so with a MIG welder.

We use MIG for smaller detail work on machine frames, brackets, stuff under 3/8" thick that needs to look good. Swapping to stainless steel is easy but very expensive as you need a different shield gas. For heavy structural work, we go to stick welding.

I have used small 110 volt MIG welders with and without shield gas. Not easy to use and not capable of sructural welds. They are very handy for sheet metal work. Light duty autobody work for example.
  • 0

User avatar
USGF
Master Sergeant
Master Sergeant
 
Posts: 173
Joined: Sun Mar 08, 2009 5:39 am
Reputation: 0

Unread postAuthor: frankrede » Sat May 23, 2009 6:40 pm

I am a certified structural steel welder and I have used both Miller, Lincoln and Hobart machines, all of the welding schools I have been too and at my local Union Pipefitters hall use Miller machines almost exclusively. Miller makes a damn good quality welder, you don't want to skimp out by buying a crap machine, like all things it is best to invest in a quality product that will last you many years to come.
  • 0

Current project: Afghanistan deployment
User avatar
frankrede
Lieutenant General
Lieutenant General
 
Posts: 3220
Joined: Thu Jul 20, 2006 9:47 pm
Reputation: 0

Unread postAuthor: POLAND_SPUD » Sat May 23, 2009 10:18 pm

sorry for going odd topic with this...
but is it true that welding can make you sterile ? I've read and heard stories that it does but I don't know if it's just an urban legend or somehting
  • 0

Children are the future

unless we stop them now
User avatar
POLAND_SPUD
Chief of Staff
Chief of Staff
 
Posts: 5405
Joined: Sat Oct 13, 2007 4:43 pm
Country: Israel (il)
Reputation: 10

Unread postAuthor: inonickname » Sat May 23, 2009 10:27 pm

POLAND_SPUD wrote:sorry for going odd topic with this...
but is it true that welding can make you sterile ? I've read and heard stories that it does but I don't know if it's just an urban legend or something


Probably just rubbish.

Though that said, don't breathe in fumes. Galvanized, aluminum, stainless and other fumes are bad. Also, arc stick flux is a mix of various chemicals that you wouldn't want to breathe in when used.

Most gasses used in shielding are inert and safe, but are often asphyxiants.
  • 0

PimpAssasinG wrote:no im strong but you are a fat gay mother sucker that gets raped by black man for fun
User avatar
inonickname
Lieutenant General
Lieutenant General
 
Posts: 2606
Joined: Sun Dec 07, 2008 3:27 am
Reputation: 0

Next

Return to Non-Spudgun Related Discussion

Who is online

Registered users: al-xg, Bing [Bot], Google [Bot], Yahoo [Bot]

Reputation System ©'