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Homemade Lathe Mk.2 (with video)

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Homemade Lathe Mk.2 (with video)

Unread postAuthor: skyjive » Fri Sep 04, 2009 5:33 pm

Hi all. So a while back I posted my first attempt at a homemade lathe here. Well not to grow long-winded, it turned out to be pretty useless for actually making spudgun parts, it just wasn't accurate enough. Here is my next attempt (actually my third attempt, but the second one was a failure as well, so no need to go into that).

The power source is the same 1/4 HP fan motor as before (it's my only electric motor until I can get my hands on another unneeded fan or better yet washing machine). The spindle is a 3/8' plain steel rod, which passes through a piece of aluminum tube, that forms a perfect bearing when oiled. The faceplate uses the same Christmas tree stand system of centering and gripping workpieces, but I added gradations on it to help me out with centering. The tailstock slides along two 3/8" steel rods, and has a wood support to keep it rock steady when turning stuff, since the rods can flex enough that they are inadequate by themselves. When turning a 3/4" coupler, the coupler just fits around the outside taper of the chuck in the tailstock, which centers it nicely. There is a wooden toolpost that is independent of the lathe and just clamps to the table in front of it. I have a screw feed system so that I can carefully control the depth of cut. For cutting o-rings I bought the appropriate tool off McMaster and after some trouble managed to mount it to my insanely non-standard tool post. I have managed to cut some very nice o-ring grooves in 3/4" PVC couplers, that have a 99% seal inside 1.25" pipe.

Video of cutting an o-ring groove:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W8kSVggx1ts

Pics:

The headstock, with the original variable speed controller from the fan:

ImageImage

The faceplate gripping system. The little holes are 1/8" apart for a reference point.

ImageImage

The cutting tool and some of its handiwork:

ImageImage

And finally the camera crane I used to film the video. Everything in sight is pretty ghetto, but I think this takes the cake.

ImageImage
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Unread postAuthor: apc » Fri Sep 04, 2009 5:37 pm

that's awesome. i used to make a piston holder out of a hole-saw, and just spin it with a drill while i pushed into it with a file
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Unread postAuthor: Technician1002 » Fri Sep 04, 2009 7:16 pm

Well done.. Two grooves.. A QDV perhaps?

:wav:
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