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How I easily gained MPG. From 28 to 33 MPG

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How I easily gained MPG. From 28 to 33 MPG

Unread postAuthor: boyntonstu » Wed Nov 11, 2009 10:37 am

How I easily gained MPG. From 28 to 33 MPG

My Australian friend Lyall Bailey convinced me to try his idea.

Modern cars use a computer (ECU) to keep the air/fuel ratio at a constant 14.7 to 1.

As all airplane pilots know, air density altitude affects the power of airplane engines.

You do not take off from mile high Denver with as much lift or power as you would at sea level.

In your car the MAP sensor measures the air density and it adjusts the fuel accordingly.

If you drive in Denver, the air intake will be less and the ECU will cut back on the gas.

No, it does not lean out the engine.

The air/fuel ratio remains at 14.7:1.

I blocked off about 40% of my air intake after the air filter using duct tape.

(A dirty air filter will also work)

I removed one lead from the battery and I shorted it to the other lead to reset the ECU.

I have driven my car for 7 years and I never saw more than 28 MPG.

For the last 15 tanks the car has averaged 31-33 MPG!

Thank you Lyall!

BoyntonStu

P.S. On the back burner is a solenoid operated butterfly air restriction that will open wide if necessary.
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Unread postAuthor: pizlo » Wed Nov 11, 2009 10:40 am

this has DEFINITELY been posted here before! please search before you make a topic!

http://www.spudfiles.com/forums/how-i-increased-my-fords-mpg-from-28-to-32-t18673.html

Wow mate, it was posted before BY YOU! :shock:
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Unread postAuthor: boyntonstu » Wed Nov 11, 2009 10:43 am

pizlo wrote:this has DEFINITELY been posted here before! please search before you make a topic!

http://www.spudfiles.com/forums/how-i-increased-my-fords-mpg-from-28-to-32-t18673.html

Wow mate, it was posted before BY YOU! :shock:


I forgot. Sorry.

The other high mileage thread caught my attention.
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Unread postAuthor: potatoflinger » Wed Nov 11, 2009 11:22 am

I'm happy with the 17 MPG my 4.0 SOHC Ranger gets :roll:
After I put an exhaust on it the fuel economy dropped from 19 to 17 MPG. The skinny pedal just sounds so good :lol:
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Unread postAuthor: CpTn_lAw » Wed Nov 11, 2009 11:28 am

My ford focus runs 32 MPG. When i first got it (it was 4 years old) i would push a little hard on the pedal and used to run 500 km with one fill. By just driving a little softer, i gained 120 km per fill. Drive soft => economies.
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Unread postAuthor: Technician1002 » Wed Nov 11, 2009 1:14 pm

Most ECU systems monitor the air mass flow to predict needed fuel. This is an open loop system. For emissions, the loop is closed with the Oxygen sensor which then fine tunes the above system by monitoring the remaining Oxygen after combustion.

Duct tape does limit the mass of air drawn in. So does a block of wood under the gas pedal. In the end they both do the same thing. It keeps the driver from pushing the throttle open all the way. High altitude of Denver simply delivers less air mass even with the throttle wide open.

Duct tape before the cleaner or a throttle plate restriction or throttle movement restriction.. They all do the same. Limit the amount of air mass that can be drawn in.

A driver with a good watchful eye on a vacuum gauge or fuel consumption meter can do the same thing by keeping his foot out of the lower pedal range and doing very gentle accelerations.

As the owner of a car with a real time fuel consumption gauge, attempts at supermilage is common and successful. It is a pain to follow me when I do that in heavy traffic. The moment a slowdown lets up, you are not popular as you let the gap widen in front of you while you take your time accelerating.

The best I got was 68MPG for 40 miles. It was in an ice storm so driving was very slow and steady. Straight level highway traveling about 30-35 MPH.

I normaly get 46MPG in my Prius.
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Unread postAuthor: psycix » Thu Nov 12, 2009 3:49 am

Blocking off the air supply in order to make it use less fuel does nothing more then cutting your power.

You could also take your friggin foot of the pedal to save gas. Accelerate slowly and cruise in a high gear.

The best thing to do in any case is to buy a car that doesn't burn fuel for fun.
I usually drive my parent's Daihatsu Cuore. With normal driving it does 47MPG.
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Unread postAuthor: VH_man » Thu Nov 12, 2009 6:56 am

You could always get a Diesel.... a Friend of mine gets about 45 MPG on his way to school.... tank of Diesel lasts him weeks, if not months.

Regardless, I love having my engine do lots of work. The idea of large acceleration, the roar, I love it. And I deal with it by paying a little more for gas... although someday Ill probably stop because of environmental stuff.

All in all, I dont think there is a good way to make a modern gasoline engine run more efficiently than it already does without some serious modifications. (for example, ford has placed the fuel injectors inside the cylinder, which gives a V6 the gas consumption of a 4Cylinder).

Good try though. I'm pretty sure this would be illegal where I am.....
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Unread postAuthor: boyntonstu » Thu Nov 12, 2009 7:47 am

Technician1002 wrote:Most ECU systems monitor the air mass flow to predict needed fuel. This is an open loop system. For emissions, the loop is closed with the Oxygen sensor which then fine tunes the above system by monitoring the remaining Oxygen after combustion.

Duct tape does limit the mass of air drawn in. So does a block of wood under the gas pedal. In the end they both do the same thing. It keeps the driver from pushing the throttle open all the way. High altitude of Denver simply delivers less air mass even with the throttle wide open.

Duct tape before the cleaner or a throttle plate restriction or throttle movement restriction.. They all do the same. Limit the amount of air mass that can be drawn in.

A driver with a good watchful eye on a vacuum gauge or fuel consumption meter can do the same thing by keeping his foot out of the lower pedal range and doing very gentle accelerations.

As the owner of a car with a real time fuel consumption gauge, attempts at supermilage is common and successful. It is a pain to follow me when I do that in heavy traffic. The moment a slowdown lets up, you are not popular as you let the gap widen in front of you while you take your time accelerating.

The best I got was 68MPG for 40 miles. It was in an ice storm so driving was very slow and steady. Straight level highway traveling about 30-35 MPH.

I normaly get 46MPG in my Prius.



High altitude of Denver simply delivers less air mass even with the throttle wide open.

And that is what a butterfly in the semi-closed position does.

If 1005 power is needed, it is easier to trigger a solenoid to open the valve than to remove a block of wood.

I have driven this car since July 2001 and I am 100% convinced that the air restriction has given me mpg gains without any noticeable disadvantages.

my car has excellent performance and excellent MPG.

Not too shabby.

I dunno if the throttle position indicator has an effect.

Can you comment?
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Unread postAuthor: Biopyro » Thu Nov 12, 2009 2:01 pm

30mpg! gah that must cost you enough! Driving normally I get about 45, but if I am challenging myself I can get about 55. My record was for a fairly short journey (7 miles, traffic lights were in my favour) where I got 63 mpg. I drive a 1l petrol Toyota yaris and just make it last by not accelerating too hard and coasting where it's appropriate.
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