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Water on Demand Invention

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Unread postAuthor: boyntonstu » Wed Sep 29, 2010 9:55 pm

saefroch wrote:
boyntonstu wrote:"Common sense tells me that you are lying about your invention. I can see no evidence of it's existence. Care to tell?"

Enough said.


Context. Enough said. You know as well as I do that I am not referring to your "Water On Demand" device.


I am not a mind reader.

What inference would you draw from a person who accuses you of lying?

Read my original post again:

"About 30 years ago, I invented a business."

The business made me a small fortune.

It was not a widget, it was an idea.

BTW I once invented a word, the name of a unique product, trademarked it, and sold it for 5 figures.
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Unread postAuthor: D_Hall » Wed Sep 29, 2010 10:03 pm

POLAND_SPUD wrote:Anyway, I still think it would be a better idea to install floor drains in the bathroom, kitchen and garage. Add to that a well designed and kept plumbing system and the risk of flooding is minimal. Even if happens the floor drains should be able to handle it.


Sure, but OMFG, you're talking about spending $30,000 or so to retrofit a house like that. Urban spelunking is EXPENSIVE. If your house isn't already equipped it'd be way cheaper/easier to just wait for the damage and hit your insurance company.
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Unread postAuthor: Ragnarok » Wed Sep 29, 2010 10:04 pm

@boyntonstu: Yes, and what Saefroch is looking to know is WHAT this invention/idea is supposed to be. I think he speaks for many of us in being interested in knowing.
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Unread postAuthor: lozz08 » Wed Sep 29, 2010 10:20 pm

Duh guys, it was clearly a money making machine jeez, read between the lines. :wink:
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Unread postAuthor: boyntonstu » Wed Sep 29, 2010 10:41 pm

D_Hall wrote:
POLAND_SPUD wrote:Anyway, I still think it would be a better idea to install floor drains in the bathroom, kitchen and garage. Add to that a well designed and kept plumbing system and the risk of flooding is minimal. Even if happens the floor drains should be able to handle it.


Sure, but OMFG, you're talking about spending $30,000 or so to retrofit a house like that. Urban spelunking is EXPENSIVE. If your house isn't already equipped it'd be way cheaper/easier to just wait for the damage and hit your insurance company.


And floor drains in every wall segment that has pipes running through it and might spring a leak.

Hey I have a better idea, an out house with no indoor plumbing.

Shucks! That was invented many years ago.
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Unread postAuthor: SpudBlaster15 » Wed Sep 29, 2010 11:06 pm

boyntonstu wrote:See my invention here:

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0vkBrdzW88I[/youtube]

E-Z Reach Inventor Creates Method To Prevent Home From Flooding

POSTED: 9:43 am EDT September 22, 2010
UPDATED: 5:43 pm EDT September 22, 2010

Local Man's Invention Stops Homes From Flooding

BOYNTON BEACH, Fla. -- A local inventor is at it again.

Stu Lieberman has put together a device that is designed to prevent a house from flooding.

Lieberman said the concept is simple.

He says his device turns off the water pressure inside a home until someone sets off the motion detector strategically placed in the bathroom, kitchen or laundry room.

"That sends a signal over the wires to the outside, where there's an automatic valve ... and that's how it works," Lieberman said.

Lieberman said the water will stay on for any preset time between 1 minute and 2 hours; enough time for a dishwasher or clothes washer to complete its cycle. The system works 24/7.

Lieberman hopes his new invention will help reduce the chances of houses in Florida from developing dangerous molds and the owners from experiencing an economic catastrophe.

--------------------------------
Lieberman auditioned for the ABC show called "American Inventor. Lieberman introduced his 2007 invention called the E-Z Reach which can remove and replace smoke detectors on high ceilings with a pole mounted tool.

Deaths and falling injuries while attempting to reach smoke detectors are avoided with E-Z Reach.


Interesting Idea.

It does have a number of problems however.

The power outage issue is the one that concerns me most.

The unnecessarily complex timing system is also an example of engineering that is not yet ready for implementation.

I also don't think it will help much.

Most plumbing leaks develop during cyclic loading of the system, i.e. when an appliance is in use, and water is flowing.

During operation of a high volume consumption appliance such as a dishwasher, the potential exists to dump significant quantities of water into your house walls, even with your system in place.

Customers are not going to be happy if they drop $700 on a "Water on Demand" system, and they still experience flood damage.

But you are the business genius, and we are mere peasants, so I guess we'll all just bow down to you.

Oh wise one.

How many grains does the motion sensor weigh?
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Unread postAuthor: POLAND_SPUD » Wed Sep 29, 2010 11:24 pm

And floor drains in every wall segment that has pipes running through it and might spring a leak.
I don't think you understand. Here in europe PVC isn't very popular - most houses have iron plumbing.

I've never even heard or seen a leaking pipe. I'd say that iron pipes and fittings are ok for 50, maybe even 70 years. My grandmother's house was built in 1950's and the plumbing was never replaced. AFAIK there haven't been any problems with it.

Back then things were built to last. If you buy a house from a real estate developer then I guess it goes without saying that cutting costs was the real priority

Damn, I think I have used some pipes that my grandfather bought back then and they are in better shape than than a length of pipe that I bough a year ago or so.

PVC might be cheap but I guess it deteriorates pretty fast and lacks structural strength.

For me your invention is like duct-taping PVC to make it stronger. Sure, it does work to some extent but it simply isn't the proper way of doing stuff. Well, I guess it isn't as simple to replace your plumbing system as it is to switch to metal in spudgunning, but you get the idea
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Unread postAuthor: starman » Thu Sep 30, 2010 1:12 am

PVC piping doesn't "deteriorate" in normal plumbing usage. Assuming proper installation, the vast majority of pipe breaks in the US is from freezing...something iron or copper pipe is just as susceptible. The next problem is where the building is shifting or settling on its foundation...something more problematic in Florida where Stu resides because of sandier soil and higher water tables. Again iron and copper will have the same issues under these conditions.

Fitting "emergency" drains would have to be done at construction time. Back fitting drains just isn't a viable option in some style construction, particularly concrete slab foundation.
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Unread postAuthor: Fnord » Thu Sep 30, 2010 11:24 am

SB15:
I don't think insults are a necessary part of this thread.

Some of you guys seem to be content ripping on the guy without suggesting anything useful.

I tend to agree with what D Hall already said. The most practical use for this system would be to keep cracked pipes from flooding in cold weather, but it probably won't do much good for an appliance failure.

In fact, I don't see ANY solution to a failed appliance unless the unit itself had sensors intergrated with the system. The only practical way to do this would be by means of a mat placed underneath every appliance that shut down the system when it got wet.
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Unread postAuthor: POLAND_SPUD » Thu Sep 30, 2010 11:50 am

It has been suggested before. Anyway check the links I posted - quite a lot of commercial systems rely on more than just one type of sensors.

Fitting "emergency" drains would have to be done at construction time.

Yeah probably, but their cost is minimal and they work.

I sort of realize that both freezing and shifting can be a problem but since PVC is weaker (and gets fragile when temperature drops) it is more prone to failing.

I know that spudgunning is something completely different but how many all metal gun have failed ? I think I remember just one bulged copper barrel and that's it.
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Last edited by POLAND_SPUD on Thu Sep 30, 2010 3:36 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Unread postAuthor: dewey-1 » Thu Sep 30, 2010 1:19 pm

I am wondering why most everyone thinks shutting off the water supply will prevent pipes from freezing! It will not!

Without either purging the pipe or making it very well insulated, the pipe/s are still prone to freezing.

As a matter of fact a dripping faucet has a much less chance of freezing.
Running water requires a whole lot more cold than contained water.

Well insulated pipe or pipe that is buried below the frost line has a much better chance of not freezing.

Pipes below the frost line is the main concern in Northern climates to prevent both freezing as well as pipes shifting due to frost heave.

Example; you will see water main supply pipes buried at 6 or more feet.

http://www.ibhs.org/natural_disasters/d ... eezing.pdf
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Unread postAuthor: jonnyboy » Thu Sep 30, 2010 7:10 pm

Edited: I just received this jewel in a private message.

"Common sense tells me that you are lying about your invention. I can see no evidence of it's existence. Care to tell?"


Posting of private messages is really not appropriate. There called private messages for a reason.

Your device sounds like a novelty. Take for example a family of four. Between leaving the timer on for the dishwasher and clothes washer is a considerable amount of time that the whole house would be pressurized. Doing 3 loads of laundry a week and running the dishwasher once a day really adds up the time the system is on. If you have small leaks in your house they'll be leaking anytime some one walks past the sensor, flushes the toilet, turns on the faucet or doing laundry etc. So you would still have running water most of the time imo.

I really don't think this is the right place to be advertising your product seeing as this is a spud gunning forum.
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Unread postAuthor: D_Hall » Thu Sep 30, 2010 10:21 pm

dewey-1 wrote:I am wondering why most everyone thinks shutting off the water supply will prevent pipes from freezing! It will not!

Reading comprehension. Your's needs improvement.

I just reread the entire thread to be sure but.... While I see you making essentially this same statement twice, I haven't seen even one person make the claim that shutting off the water supply will prevent freezing. Not one. Let me say that again in all capital letters: NOBODY IN THIS ENTIRE THREAD HAS CLAIMED THAT SUCH A DEVICE WILL PREVENT PIPES FROM FREEZING. NOT ONE PERSON!

The claim is that shutting off the water supply will minimize/reduce flood damage. That's a very different claim. To put it in "car terms": Seat belts don't prevent automobile accidents, but they do minimize the damage a wreck may cause.
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