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Table Saw Invention

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Unread postAuthor: MrCrowley » Fri Mar 25, 2011 10:39 pm

Are there any particular reasons table saws were never made like how you've made yours, Stu?
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Unread postAuthor: Gaderelguitarist » Fri Mar 25, 2011 10:46 pm

Are there any particular reasons table saws were never made like how you've made yours, Stu?


The closest thing I can think to Stu's is a radial arm saw. It's essentially a chop saw with a horizontal motion built in for making larger cuts in large flat stock. Chain hardware stores like Home Depot and Lowes have very large versions of these for cutting plywood for customers.

I wonder if the radial arm saw was inspiration, or he simply didn't want to buy one :?
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Unread postAuthor: MrCrowley » Fri Mar 25, 2011 10:49 pm

Ah yup I know them. Used them a lot in high school when I did 'Hard Tech'. Speaking of high school, my friend almost lost his finger on a drop saw and by that I mean it almost cut entirely through his finger. It was hanging on by a thread, literally.
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Unread postAuthor: Gaderelguitarist » Fri Mar 25, 2011 10:55 pm

I've never been mis-fortunate enough to have trouble on a table saw. In fact, I'm very confident with my abilities to operate one. Now band saws are a different story. Those are some hungry little machines. Good thing my thumb had a pad of scar tissue on it, or I might have actually bled a bit.

I think the general rule of thumb (because I just referenced my thumb) is to approach the machine with respect for the harm it can do to you. Everything has the potential to cause harm. The responsibility lies with the operator of the machine, not it's designer.
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Unread postAuthor: boyntonstu » Fri Mar 25, 2011 11:07 pm

MrCrowley wrote:Are there any particular reasons table saws were never made like how you've made yours, Stu?


Why are the numbers made, or the money earned your issue?

I wanted a safe saw to use.

I built one.

It is that simple.

Same with my $100 elevator.

I want cheap, effective, and safe.

You?

----------------------

Gaderelguitarist wrote:Stu, I noticed that your power switch is positioned above the danger zone of your modification. While I'm almost positive that you would have to actively try to make a dangerous situation for yourself while turning the saw on or off, wouldn't a more accessible switch be more safety friendly?

I realize that this would mean modifying a power tool that you might not necessarily want to mangle, but thats just my two cents.

And to those of you that don't know, kick back is terrible. It will send a piece of wood into you with plenty of force, enough to break a rib or two. Imagine if it was flung at an angle at your throat. Goodbye world of the living.

Nice elimination of that problem with the blade reversal. I'm curious to see a comparison of cut quality with your modification rip saw and a standard table saw.


See how far the push off switch is above the cutting edge of the blade?

There is no reason to change its location for safety reasons.

The rip saw quality is exactly the same as a table saw; no better and no worse.

OTOH The crosscut of my saw is superior to a tale saw in accuracy and it cuts perfect squares.

I crosscut 95% of the time.
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Last edited by boyntonstu on Fri Mar 25, 2011 11:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Unread postAuthor: MrCrowley » Fri Mar 25, 2011 11:16 pm

Hahahaha Stu you really need to calm down. I wasn't being hostile at all, it was just a question because I literally have no expertise and little experience in the field. I just wondered why there weren't more table saw designs like this if there were no disadvantages but only advantages to your design. Surely you weren't the first person to think of this (although you may have been the first to put it in to practice), perhaps someone found a problem with this particular design.

Take a chill pill.


edit: You'll notice I didn't ask why you built it but why all other table saws aren't built like this.
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Unread postAuthor: Gaderelguitarist » Fri Mar 25, 2011 11:40 pm

Right I see how it is completely out of the way of the blade, I guess I just personally prefer not reaching up to turn things off. Whether for laziness or some other reason. I'm glad to hear that it cuts a fine edge. I'm marginally curious as to why the crosscut is more effective with your setup than a standard table saw. You employ a special fence?

I would still like to know if you had a radial arm saw in mind when building this.

All things aside, I'll stick with my table saw as it is.
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Unread postAuthor: boyntonstu » Sat Mar 26, 2011 7:18 am

MrCrowley wrote:Hahahaha Stu you really need to calm down. I wasn't being hostile at all, it was just a question because I literally have no expertise and little experience in the field. I just wondered why there weren't more table saw designs like this if there were no disadvantages but only advantages to your design. Surely you weren't the first person to think of this (although you may have been the first to put it in to practice), perhaps someone found a problem with this particular design.

Take a chill pill.


edit: You'll notice I didn't ask why you built it but why all other table saws aren't built like this.


Think back to your High School experience.


If my saw was used, would the accident you described happen?
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Unread postAuthor: MrCrowley » Sat Mar 26, 2011 7:46 am

No. What does that have to do with all table saws not being made like yours? Do you even understand what I'm asking?

This is a sincere, genuine question: why are all table saws made how they are (saw on the table) and not inverted (saw above the table) like yours? This is not a hostile question and is not meant to demean your invention, if anything it would compliment it. I'm not sure if anyone has so far found a fault with your 'invention' so my question is why all table saws are not made like yours. As for kickback and risk of losing a finger, yours does appear to be safer. Then again, I have very little experience in this field so my thoughts on the matter mean little.

Is it just me or are you having trouble understanding what I'm asking?
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Unread postAuthor: boyntonstu » Sat Mar 26, 2011 8:28 am

MrCrowley wrote:No. What does that have to do with all table saws not being made like yours? Do you even understand what I'm asking?

This is a sincere, genuine question: why are all table saws made how they are (saw on the table) and not inverted (saw above the table) like yours? This is not a hostile question and is not meant to demean your invention, if anything it would compliment it. I'm not sure if anyone has so far found a fault with your 'invention' so my question is why all table saws are not made like yours. As for kickback and risk of losing a finger, yours does appear to be safer. Then again, I have very little experience in this field so my thoughts on the matter mean little.

Is it just me or are you having trouble understanding what I'm asking?


Look, you can lead a horse to water but you cannot make it drink.

Let's compare TS vs Thingy.

A TS can only tilt in 1 direction, Thingy in 2 directions.
One of the reasons for the Thingy is that I ran into an impossible cut on my TS.
It got me thinking about an ideal saw that could do the cut. Lightbulb! THINGY!

Safety 1: A TS has a dangerous spinning blade that is exposed above the table. Anything can fall onto the blade including fingers.

Thingy: The blade is enclosed and nothing from above can fall onto it.

Safety 2: The operator of a table saw usually stands in line with the blade and the spinning teeth 'see' his face and eyes.

Thingy: Operator stands aside the spinning blade hiding from the spinning teeth.

Safety 3: Kickback: TS-always a danger. Thingy-never a danger.

Should anything kickback with a Thingy, the piece could never hit you.

(I never stand in front of my loaded air cannon, why should I stand in front of a spinning blade?)

There are some additional points, but I hope that you get the point.

Like so many of my inventions, the Thingy is unconventional, and many people are skeptical of new ideas.

Being ahead of the crowd is not exactly the most comfortable place to be, but it has been the story of my life.

I accept it.
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Unread postAuthor: MrCrowley » Sat Mar 26, 2011 9:17 am

Either you're on drugs or you're trolling. Either way, thread locked because this is just ridiculous, Stu.

Got a problem with me locking this, talk to PCGUY.
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