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Propane regulator?

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Propane regulator?

Unread postAuthor: ThatGuy » Tue Jan 24, 2012 7:12 pm

I don't know if this belongs here but is there a cheap way to regulate the small Propane tanks, like the ones you would put a torch on?
I am trying to make a propane Bunsen burner setup for relatively cheap.
Any suggestions on what I would need? plan on using an on/off valve, hose, and Tirrill burner.

Before you jump to conclusions I am not starting a meth lab :wink:
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Unread postAuthor: Fnord » Tue Jan 24, 2012 8:26 pm

Does it need to be regulated? You might be fine with just a flow control.
One of those cheapo plumbing torches with the torch head removed and a hose barb attached will give you enough flow for a burner. You could even just add a length of hose between the valve and the torch head. Bend some heavy wire for a stand. Instant bunsen burner for under $15.
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Unread postAuthor: jimmy101 » Tue Jan 24, 2012 8:55 pm

A Bernzomatic torch is a Bunsen burner. (E.g., http://www.bernzomatic.com/PRODUCTS/KIT ... fault.aspx)
Flow and pressure are regulated by the size of the orifice. If you look closely at the tip of the torch, after removing the air mixer, you can just barely see the hole, it has a very small diameter.

So, like Fnord said, just make a wire holder for the torch that holds the outlet vertical and you are good to go. If you want to control air flow (so you can get an oxidizing flame), a sheet metal shroud could be made that goes around the mixer. As the shroud is twisted the air inlets are blocked.

(Torch hint: most torches like this, as well as lab Bunsen burners, are easier to light if airflow is blocked, just wrap your hand around the base of the mixer when lighting and the torch is easier to light.)
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Unread postAuthor: Technician1002 » Tue Jan 24, 2012 10:06 pm

Most lab bunsen burners are a low pressure natural gas device which runs below 1/2 PSI. A pencil flame torch has higher flow velocity, faster burn rate and thus a hotter hot spot, not a soft warming flame.

A recommended regulator is a BBQ regulator which regulates to about 12 inch WC. Natural gas is often regulated to about 1/2 that. In addition to the regulator, a flow control valve will still be needed. Your burner will need to include an air control as Propane uses less air than natural gas to burn properly.
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Unread postAuthor: ThatGuy » Tue Jan 24, 2012 11:23 pm

a Tirrill burner is different from a Bunsen burner by having a flow control valve- so I need a pressure regulator... will any propane regulator fit on one of those smaller 12 oz propane tanks?

thanks for the replies though- Like Technician said I need lower pressure and the torches don't regulate as much as I need.
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Unread postAuthor: Technician1002 » Wed Jan 25, 2012 2:09 am

Many Coleman appliances have a regulator as part of the valve. Many such as the lantern valve/regulator adjust from 0 PSI to about 10 PSI. One should meet your needs. They connect directly to the bottle. Some table top BBQs also have a low pressure regulator.

http://www.coleman.com/coleman/parts/Pr ... =5150-700T
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Unread postAuthor: jimmy101 » Sat Jan 28, 2012 12:33 pm

ThatGuy wrote:a Tirrill burner is different from a Bunsen burner by having a flow control valve- so I need a pressure regulator... will any propane regulator fit on one of those smaller 12 oz propane tanks?

thanks for the replies though- Like Technician said I need lower pressure and the torches don't regulate as much as I need.

Bunsen burners also usually have flow control valves. Technically that makes them Tirrill burners though they are stilled usually called Bunsen Burners.

The tiny aperture in a typical Bernzomatic torch head is suitable for a typical sized Bunsen (Tirrill) Burner but probably too large for a micro burner. The hole is sized to work properly with the propane cylinder's normal pressure and the limited control ability of the valve.
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Unread postAuthor: domsmith » Wed Apr 11, 2012 12:45 am

This forum should be treated with respect...not spam..


BTB
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Unread postAuthor: jimmy101 » Wed Apr 11, 2012 11:37 am

domsmith wrote:In fact one should have proper knowledge on how to work on a propane system. Propane when improperly handled can be very dangerous and should always be treated with the utmost respect. Only qualified technician should check it.

propane valve | plastic inserts
Uh, OK.

Same can be said for gasoline, and butane, and dihdrogen monoxide. :D
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Unread postAuthor: Gippeto » Wed Apr 11, 2012 1:50 pm

jimmy101 wrote:Same can be said for gasoline, and butane, and dihdrogen monoxide. :D


Yup...that last one has been responsible for a lot of deaths throughout the ages. :wink:
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Unread postAuthor: Fnord » Wed Apr 11, 2012 5:24 pm

^^Turning Test passed. :D

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Unread postAuthor: ThatGuy » Thu Apr 12, 2012 10:47 pm

Would a regular propane grill be able to reach at least 400-500 degrees Fahrenheit?
Like a camping or other portable grill?
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Unread postAuthor: Fnord » Fri Apr 13, 2012 4:24 pm

Yes, in most cases. At one point I had around 20 pounds of steel up to that temperature with a coleman grill (I was coating the inside of a BP cannon with solder, to keep corrosion down).
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Unread postAuthor: jimmy101 » Fri Apr 13, 2012 7:18 pm

I think it depends a lot on what you are heating. The flame temp of propane in air is a lot higher than 500F (more like 4000F), but getting enough heat and keeping the heat where you want it is probably the bigger challenge.

google google ... max flame temp in air for propane is 3,620 °F (2,000C)
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Unread postAuthor: ThatGuy » Sat Apr 14, 2012 10:14 am

OK thanks that will be easier and safer than trying to make a burner
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