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Machining projects

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Unread postAuthor: jackssmirkingrevenge » Sun May 27, 2007 11:16 pm

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Unread postAuthor: CS » Mon May 28, 2007 10:18 pm

I would say Aluminum is fairly priced. I'm looking to place my order at <a href="http://www.industrialmetalsales.com/">Industrial Metal Sales</a>. If I ever do start casting it will probably be into next school year, because are welding teacher has a deal with the local steel fabricator (they do aluminum as well) to collect there scraps. So I will try, and pick up the AL scraps.

Yeah my lathe has a lot of backlash, and I read the Sieg X2 also has a lot of backlash. Most the time I try, and stick a dial indicator on the axis that I am moving on to get the most accurate measurement. As long as your running manually, and you compensate for the backlash, you don't have much trouble.

Jack, correct me if I am wrong, but the posted designs would be less efficient, would the not?
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Unread postAuthor: goathunter » Mon May 28, 2007 10:27 pm

Hah, you haven't seen slop in a piece of machinery until you've seen my lathe(1930's make).The bit holder slides back and forth a 1/4".Definitely have to watch and compensate with that one.I've found my pocket knife the most valuable tool for plastic. :D I can't wait until I get a 3 phase converter for my big ol' Southbend.Nothing like a tons worth of lathing power.

Pimpman, when are you setting up that website?
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Unread postAuthor: jackssmirkingrevenge » Mon May 28, 2007 11:02 pm

pimpmann22 wrote:Jack, correct me if I am wrong, but the posted designs would be less efficient, would the not?


They're pretty much industry standard for air motors, besides remember that all your exhaust will ge going towards propelling BBs out of the barrel so motor efficiency isn't really a big deal anyway - au contraire, the more inefficient (ie the higher the air pressure as it leaves the motor) the more power you'll have for your BBs.
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Unread postAuthor: CS » Mon May 28, 2007 11:44 pm

Yours is purely play in the threaded rod-carriage connection? I mean personally I have maybe a couple thousandths there, most of its just the hand wheel is mounted real sh*tty. (not really sure why I considered it such, I have read documentation that exclusively states thats not "slop")

Yeah I bet that South Bend will be nice, even some of the most advanced machinists seem to have one of those old things tucked away just because they are so well built, or so I hear. That's something I like about my 8x12 it totally dwarfs the 7x10 at 230lbs. versus 90lbs. Thats all about all the good you will hear out of the 8" series, there not that well liked in the hobbyist community. Although I must admit, I love mine.

One thing that has puzzled me, why is there design so "curvo-licious"? (South-Bend) Because its obvious that any tolerance holding curve, is harder then it's straight line counter-part. Well I suppose that the curve could have been used to mask there inability to make precision parts. IDK, just something that has always nagged at me.

About the site, it is far off. I have already wrote two articles on the height gage, and surface plate, but thats just a fracture of the tooling. Hell those are layout equipment, not even tooling. I think I'll set a goal at one article a day. Hope to have a lot of accompanying images, I've been told I am fairly good with photography.

*pulls head out of ass*
Yeah I don't know what I was thinking on the efficiency stint. In all truth a less efficient motor may be optimal. If the barrels RPM is to high, you may have problems with the air stream changing to rapidly. At any rate, where could I acquire, or possibly how would I make a turbine. Confronted with the lack of milling accessories, that could be very unlikely. BTW, thanks for your input, information, and inspiration so far. (the three I's?)
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Unread postAuthor: goathunter » Tue May 29, 2007 8:10 am

You are correct pimpman,that and one of the spacers is gone.The lathe is such a pain in the rear end to take apart I haven't got around to replacing stuff,not to mention the difficulty in finding parts.
I never really wondered about Southbend.Heck,their name implies the use of curves :wink: I figured since mine came off of a Navy ship it ought to be good enough for me.If I could afford a Smithy I'd probably go with that but a $3,000 machine is a little out of my budget right now.
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Unread postAuthor: jrrdw » Tue May 29, 2007 6:26 pm

Smithy's are nice but require constent readjustment, (my nabior has one). South Bend lathe's are a dream come true! Search ebay for parts, be ready to out bid the highest bidder at the last 30 seconds of the auction, SB parts go like hot cakes! and some parts are still made.
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Unread postAuthor: CS » Sun Jun 03, 2007 9:28 pm

Well it turns out that all of our old window frames were made out of aluminum, and the burn out furnace my father used for jewelry is hot enough to melt aluminum. I had made a large mug in welding with 1/4" walls, but could never stop it from rusting, so it became the crucible.

So casting, then machining items is back in the picture. Tomorrow I can pick up some silica sand, and fire clay to make some molding sand. So what to make? And is there any particularly savvy in casting? Just had a few question about the mold making process that I was hoping I could bounce off someone.
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