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Copper questions

Post questions and info about pneumatic (compressed gas) powered cannons here. This includes discussion about valves, pipe types, compressors, alternate gas setups, and anything else relevant.
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Copper questions

Unread postAuthor: veginator » Fri Nov 09, 2007 9:50 pm

I have a few questions about copper pipe.

1.Is it better to epoxy or solder pipe?

2.Do I have to use a torch or can I use soldering iron if I have to solder?

3.What pressures are safe to use?

4.What is the difference between the different types of copper?

Please help me I am totally clueless when it comes to copper I have never used it before and want to make sure I am being safe.
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Unread postAuthor: Zen/// » Fri Nov 09, 2007 9:54 pm

1. SOLDER (but some epoxies just 4 copper are insanely strong)
2. I used a torch for mine.
3. Ive read around and soldered joints hold about 200psi, while the pipe stands much more then that. (but ragnarok's cannon has a operating pressure of 300psi)
4. Thickness or some specifically deigned for pressure.
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Unread postAuthor: DYI » Fri Nov 09, 2007 10:19 pm

Just For Copper is stronger than almost any copper pipe ratings, so it should be as good as soldering. Epoxy, if prepared properly, should be good for at least 200 psi.

You can't use a soldering irong for pipe

It is safe to use up to the pressure the lowest rated part of the system is rated for. Good soldered joints are typically good for more pressure than the fittings are rated for. 1090 psi for smaller fittings (<1.25") with 95/5 tin/antimony solder.

ACR- refrigeration and AC field service. 1/2" ACR rated for 781 psi @100F
DWV- drain waste vent. 2" DWV rated for 373 psi @ 100F
M- "low pressure". 1/2" type M rated for 850 psi @ 100F
L- "medium pressure" . 1/2" type L rated for 1242 psi @ 100F
K- "high pressure". 1/2" type K rated for 1534 psi @ 100 F

DWV copper fittings 2" or under rated for 390 psi
All figures are for drawn tubing. Annealed tubing has lower pressure ratings and is more expensive.
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Unread postAuthor: BigGrib » Fri Nov 09, 2007 10:33 pm

Solder
Torch (can't use an iron on anything but electrical wires)
Whatever it's rated for
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Unread postAuthor: Hotwired » Fri Nov 09, 2007 10:58 pm

Solder is strongest, appropriate epoxies are more convenient.

Pressure-wise, even regular domestic copper plumbing pipe is safe to 300psi+ until it gets to the kind of sizes where you're paying a small fortune for each pipe.

The cannon in my sig has epoxied joints and has been used at 300psi.

The pipes have burst pressures way above the operating pressures and will need thousands of psi to rupture the affordable sizes.
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Unread postAuthor: veginator » Sat Nov 10, 2007 6:48 am

I just wanted to know if it was safe to use a shock pump to 200 - 250 psi in a one inch chamber.
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Unread postAuthor: Hotwired » Sat Nov 10, 2007 7:59 am

Yes.

You'd have to really feel like a workout to pump up a 1" diameter chamber of any length with a shock pump though.

Use a floor pump instead, you can overpump some types to that kind of pressure. 240psi using my floor pump. I only dont go any higher because it might seriously screw up the gauge as the needle is pressing against the wrong side of the 0psi pin by that time.
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Unread postAuthor: DYI » Sat Nov 10, 2007 11:05 am

Ever considered getting a higher pressure gauge? :lol: The one you have will already be irrepairably damaged if you have taken it over its maximum pressure. Gauges aren't supposed to be used above 3/4 of their highest number EVER. You can order all sorts of useful pressure gauges from your local compressed gas supply depot.
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Unread postAuthor: Hotwired » Sat Nov 10, 2007 11:41 am

I know :D

You can take it to the max for short periods with long periods of recovery afterwards though.

It's all stuck in the dam plastic moulding. Presumably theres a screw thread in there somewhere it can unscrew from but it's all been designed to be a pain to disassemble.
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Unread postAuthor: Hawkeye » Sat Nov 10, 2007 11:45 am

Why don't you just take it off if you know how many strokes of the pump equals a particular psi? I just temporarily attached a shock pump to a fitting on my gun and then pumped it up with my homemade pump and counted how many strokes it took to reach 350 psi on the shock pump gauge.
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