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Volume of a Fitting

Post questions and info about pneumatic (compressed gas) powered cannons here. This includes discussion about valves, pipe types, compressors, alternate gas setups, and anything else relevant.
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Volume of a Fitting

Unread postAuthor: socoj2 » Mon May 12, 2008 9:31 pm

So. for 1.5" pipe determining volume of a Fitting.

This is for a Stock that is mostly Fittings and not much pipe.

For a 90 Degree elbow it takes 1.5*Diameter of the pipe to complete the bend. *I THINK*

for a 1.5" pipe that would be 2.25" for an elbow.

for a 45 degree turn i think it is something like 1.46.... i cant remember.

Anyway is there a resource for helping calculate to the volume in fittings?
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Unread postAuthor: Lentamentalisk » Mon May 12, 2008 9:55 pm

Not sure what you are trying to say...
Why not just fill it with water and then measure how much fit in?
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Unread postAuthor: jr » Tue May 13, 2008 12:47 am

Lentamentalisk ....you hit the nail on the head!

Thats exactly what I do becuase it is to hard to calculate all that stuff....
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Unread postAuthor: psycix » Tue May 13, 2008 5:08 am

If you really want to calculate the volume of a stock, then you can.
How to do this:
Precisely measure all distances, this should take a few hours for a whole stock.
Then divide everything into small pieces, an elbow for example consists of pieces of cillinders and a piece of a sphere.
This might take hours of calculation.
Next count it all up, and voila! Youve got your volume.
It may have taken a whole day, and because of measuring faults it isnt very accurate, but hey, you saved water!
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Unread postAuthor: mark.f » Tue May 13, 2008 1:06 pm

Or...

Approximate the bends in the elbows with polynomials or other elementary functions, create a 2-d cross section on the xy coordinate plane, choose your endpoints carefully, and use the washer method to calculate the volume of the fitting.

Volume = the integral from a to b of, parenthetically, R<sup>2</sup>-r<sup>2</sup>, where a and b are the endpoints of the curves and R and r are your polynomial approximations.

Or...

Just do a fluid volume measurement. Even though some on this forum are mathematically capable of doing the above if provided a 2-d cross section of a fitting (which is elusive in the first place), mostly all would still just use the fluid volume measurement to save time and frustration.
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