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Fireman's Airtank

Post questions and info about pneumatic (compressed gas) powered cannons here. This includes discussion about valves, pipe types, compressors, alternate gas setups, and anything else relevant.
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Fireman's Airtank

Unread postAuthor: Pilgrimman » Tue Dec 30, 2008 12:10 am

As the title suggests, I have a fireman's airtank! I got it for 10$ which was too good to pass up. However, I have some questions:

1. It is one of those tanks that is covered in a fiber type wrap. I hear these are rated for higher pressure than say, a SCUBA tank. If this is true, what is a ballpark working pressure?

2. What does the writing (pictured below) mean, and is it relevant to me?

3. The outlet has holes in the threaded bit. (see pic) What are these for?

4. Does this tank require a regulator, or is one built in?

5. What type of place would be able to hydro-test it?

6. Where could I get it filled?

(I thought a SCUBA shop could do 5 and 6, but I want your input.)

Thanks in advance!
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Attachments
Tankoutput.jpg
These are the holes mentioned above. They are intentional, but I don't know what they are for.
Tanktype.jpg
This is the aforementioned writing.
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Unread postAuthor: Lentamentalisk » Tue Dec 30, 2008 2:41 am

I have a SCBA tank too. They generally run at around 2000psi-3000psi, and require a regulator. You may be able to get them filled and hydro at a welding shop too.
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Unread postAuthor: grumpy » Tue Dec 30, 2008 3:53 am

@Pilgrimman, most scuba shops do not hydro test tanks themselives , but send them out to be done. usualy costs 40 to 50 dollars to get done and can take up to 2 weeks.

the numbers on the label that you should pay attention to are the DOT-E 8059 this tells you how often it must hydro tested . if that is 4500 after the DOT number that means it is a 4500 psi tank. the 2-92 is the born on date , that is when it was manufactured and first hydro tested.

the holes you refer to are pressure release holes they vent preassure before the airline is completely unscrewed . no they do not come with a regulator , the reg is attached with the airlines.
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Unread postAuthor: Pilgrimman » Tue Dec 30, 2008 10:17 pm

Wow, you guys sure know your stuff! That pretty much answers all my questions! Thanks a zillion!
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Unread postAuthor: Weaver » Wed Jan 07, 2009 10:17 pm

A few bits of info that I believe to be correct to the best of my knowledge:

There are 3(?) different types of Scba tanks that I have come across in the past. Steel, Glass fiber, and Carbon fiber.

Steel and Carbon fiber have an indefinite lifespan AFAIK, but Glass fiber tanks have a lifespan of a maximum 15 years from date of manufacture; meaning after the manufacture date on your tank (if it is indeed Glass fiber, no shop will hydrotest or fill after that date).

This was 1st hand info from my local fire extinguisher shop. They do Hydrotesting, and filling of a large number of different tank types.

I hope this info was useful, I believe it to be correct until corrected. :wink:

Other info relating to this has been posted ahead of me.

EDIT

I have also been told that the U.S. *may* be adopting new rules for tanks manufactured after 2005; max recommended lifespan for glass fiber tanks will be extended to 30 years from DOM.
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Unread postAuthor: DeathBlade » Thu Jan 08, 2009 6:14 pm

There is also Alumnium SCBA tanks, I have one on my rig at work. If its out of hydro, you may be able to have it convertered to C02 service. I remember the guy that refills my tanks said something about that he could rehydro a fiberglass tank for Co2 since its only 900max psi vs 2500+ psi. I'll check with him soon.
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Unread postAuthor: Hubb » Thu Jan 08, 2009 6:19 pm

This link may help you some. It's meant for paintball tanks, but I'm sure the readings are the same.
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