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benifit's/liquid gass

Post questions and info about pneumatic (compressed gas) powered cannons here. This includes discussion about valves, pipe types, compressors, alternate gas setups, and anything else relevant.
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benifit's/liquid gass

Unread postAuthor: Sticky_Tape » Sun Jan 18, 2009 5:40 pm

I don't have any idea why there would be more benifits from gass stored as a liquid. It is the same ammount of gass compressed into the same volume just as a liquid. Well maybe if it was different types of gasses or somthing. Any pneumatic experts wan't to post your thoughts?
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Unread postAuthor: Hotwired » Sun Jan 18, 2009 6:01 pm

There's a saving on space for the same mass of propellant.

...and that's about it.

Worthwhile for low gas consumption launchers and where performance is secondary to portability.

Because a downside is that allowing large quantities to evaporate quickly is that the gas comes out pretty dam cold.
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Unread postAuthor: ALIHISGREAT » Mon Jan 19, 2009 2:56 am

there are benefits to having liquid gas.... but the drawback is getting liquid gas :wink:

...well a decent gas anyway, CO2 in paintball bottles is liquid alot of the time especially in the winter.... and propane can be a liquid too i do believe... but air....
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Unread postAuthor: psycix » Mon Jan 19, 2009 5:54 am

High density is the big plus. You can get alot of shots out of a small volume.
Freezing up is the downside (vaporisation takes away ALOT of thermal energy)

Another thing I do not like from CO2 is the higher molecular weight -> lower speed of sound -> limitation of power on high performance guns.
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Unread postAuthor: TurboSuper » Mon Jan 19, 2009 6:26 am

The idea is that as soon as you increase the volume of a given vessel, the pressure will automatically decrease (provided all other variables such as temperature/# of molecules remains constant). So you basically will be reducing the power of your [insert pneumatic toy] here with every shot.

Liquifying a gas prevents this, since the liquid will vapourize to compensate for the pressure deficiency.
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Unread postAuthor: D_Hall » Mon Jan 19, 2009 9:44 am

You haven't really given a context but in industry....

...If you want to move a large quantity of gas from PointA to PointB, you pretty much *HAVE* to liquify.

Take oxygen. You want to move a few tons of it. If you take it at atomspheric you need a train to move it. If you compress it down to a high density.... Now it's small enough to fit on a truck, but the tank that can hold oxygen as a gas compressed that highly? Hey, that tank is probably gonna weigh about 50 tons all by itself.

What do you do?

Refrigerate!

With liquid oxygen I now have a dense product that can be held in a physically small space AND it can be held at atmospheric pressure. Instead of a 50 ton pressure vessel, now all I need is an insulated tank. Easy!
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Unread postAuthor: suburban spudgunner » Mon Jan 19, 2009 12:17 pm

Larger amounts (mol) of liquid gas can be stored in a given space at a lower pressure; I believe most gases of this type (such as CO2) would vaporize once you opened your release valve, theoretically providing more power than air.
However, like everyone said, you'd need a special kind of input and release valve, otherwise they would just freeze, resulting in a possibly catastrophic situation.
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