Login    Register
User Information
Username:
Password:
We are a free and open
community, all are welcome.
Click here to Register
Sponsored
Who is online

In total there are 75 users online :: 5 registered, 0 hidden and 70 guests


Most users ever online was 155 on Mon Aug 15, 2016 1:40 am

Registered users: Bing [Bot], Google [Bot], Google Adsense [Bot], MSNbot Media, Yahoo [Bot] based on users active over the past 5 minutes

The Team
Administrators
Global Moderators
global_moderators.png CS

Threaded tube?

Post questions and info about pneumatic (compressed gas) powered cannons here. This includes discussion about valves, pipe types, compressors, alternate gas setups, and anything else relevant.
Sponsored 
  • Author
    Message

Threaded tube?

Unread postAuthor: Jack_Hogg » Sat Feb 13, 2010 11:44 am

Well, I am planning to build another airgun. This time no shotgun, but a 20mm short sniper. I do like to make it as compact as possible, so instead of a normal nipple, I want to use a piece of threaded tube to connect my fittings. So if anyone know where i can get these, that would be great :roll:

Like my other one
Image


And the treaded pipe I accidentally found on school
Image

Thanks
  • 0

User avatar
Jack_Hogg
Sergeant First Class
Sergeant First Class
 
Posts: 133
Joined: Tue Feb 20, 2007 7:56 am
Reputation: 0

Re: Threaded tube?

Unread postAuthor: Mr.Sandman » Sat Feb 13, 2010 12:50 pm

Jack_Hogg wrote:Well, I am planning to build a 20mm short sniper.

Good gracious, you cant make a person from fittings :D . More to the point it looks like a fully threaded coupling, we have them at my local ace but they are pretty expensive.

I wouldn't recommend them, because its going to be difficult getting them out of the fittings. I would recommend a hex close nipple. They are cheap and well suited to your needs.
  • 0

Yeah, it's that important.
User avatar
Mr.Sandman
Donating Member
Donating Member
 
Posts: 762
Joined: Fri Mar 28, 2008 9:10 am
Country: Antarctica (aq)
Reputation: 0

Re: Threaded tube?

Unread postAuthor: Jack_Hogg » Sat Feb 13, 2010 12:59 pm

Mr.Sandman wrote:
Jack_Hogg wrote:Well, I am planning to build a 20mm short sniper.

Good gracious, you cant make a person from fittings :D


Oh yea, I forgot to add "rifle"...
Well, I am going to search for close nipples next week. Thanks.
  • 0

User avatar
Jack_Hogg
Sergeant First Class
Sergeant First Class
 
Posts: 133
Joined: Tue Feb 20, 2007 7:56 am
Reputation: 0

Unread postAuthor: D_Hall » Sat Feb 13, 2010 1:02 pm

Looks to long to simply be a fully threaded nipple. Pipe threads are tapered. I imagine that a tapered thread as long as that piece appears to be would destroy the pipe. Are we sure that's not just a piece of pipe that somebody threw on a lathe and cut threads into? IE, not pipe threads, but standard UNC threads (or similar)? I wouldn't be shocked to find something like that in an academic environment and it would explain why they're so hard to find (if it's supposedly an off the shelf part).
  • 0

Simulation geek (GGDT / HGDT) and designer of Vera.
User avatar
D_Hall
Donating Member
Donating Member
 
Posts: 1759
Joined: Thu Feb 07, 2008 7:37 pm
Location: SoCal
Reputation: 6

Unread postAuthor: POLAND_SPUD » Sat Feb 13, 2010 1:29 pm

I know I've seen them somewhere... I imagine they are rare because they are not very practical when compared with standard nipples
  • 0

Children are the future

unless we stop them now
User avatar
POLAND_SPUD
Chief of Staff
Chief of Staff
 
Posts: 5405
Joined: Sat Oct 13, 2007 4:43 pm
Country: Israel (il)
Reputation: 10

Unread postAuthor: Jack_Hogg » Sat Feb 13, 2010 1:30 pm

There is also a piece on the Pitbull 9mm first photo.

@D_Hall
I don't think someone has turned a solid piece of brass on a lathe and cut threads and drilled a hole through. The inside of that piece was smooth. I think it was a seamless thick walled pipe, that was threaded on a lathe in a factory or something... The thread was a standard BSP gas thread. I did cut a straight piece off like 30mm long, and used it to connect my T's together (and endcap).
  • 0

User avatar
Jack_Hogg
Sergeant First Class
Sergeant First Class
 
Posts: 133
Joined: Tue Feb 20, 2007 7:56 am
Reputation: 0

Unread postAuthor: POLAND_SPUD » Sat Feb 13, 2010 1:44 pm

so couldn't you get a pipe and cut threads in it ??
  • 0

Children are the future

unless we stop them now
User avatar
POLAND_SPUD
Chief of Staff
Chief of Staff
 
Posts: 5405
Joined: Sat Oct 13, 2007 4:43 pm
Country: Israel (il)
Reputation: 10

Sponsored

Sponsor
 


Unread postAuthor: Jack_Hogg » Sat Feb 13, 2010 1:47 pm

POLAND_SPUD wrote:so couldn't you get a pipe and cut threads in it ??


I if I could cut BSP threads on a lathe, I would probably do that. But on my school there is one very old lathe that I only use. I doubt that I can cut threads with that thing.
  • 0

User avatar
Jack_Hogg
Sergeant First Class
Sergeant First Class
 
Posts: 133
Joined: Tue Feb 20, 2007 7:56 am
Reputation: 0

Unread postAuthor: POLAND_SPUD » Sat Feb 13, 2010 2:12 pm

you could do it with a thread cutter
  • 0

Children are the future

unless we stop them now
User avatar
POLAND_SPUD
Chief of Staff
Chief of Staff
 
Posts: 5405
Joined: Sat Oct 13, 2007 4:43 pm
Country: Israel (il)
Reputation: 10

Unread postAuthor: D_Hall » Sat Feb 13, 2010 2:13 pm

Jack_Hogg wrote:I don't think someone has turned a solid piece of brass on a lathe and cut threads and drilled a hole through.

Never said it was. Said I figured somebody took a piece of pipe and threaded it. But more significantly....

The thread was a standard BSP gas thread. I did cut a straight piece off like 30mm long, and used it to connect my T's together (and endcap).

OK, so you're in the UK or some such. My point stands that I doubt it was a tapered thread (in the US, pipe threads are normally NPT - a tapered thread).

But even with BSP there are two standards. Tapered and parallel (or so sayeth wikipedia). I'd still wager that your piece of pipe has parallel threads.


But on my school there is one very old lathe that I only use. I doubt that I can cut threads with that thing.

Why do you say that? Lathes *excel* at cutting threads. Use the lathe to cut the threads and you'll generally get a far superior product than if you use a traditional tap/dye setup to cut threads. Yes, it takes a bit more skill and yes, it takes longer.... But the results can be spectacular.
  • 0

Simulation geek (GGDT / HGDT) and designer of Vera.
User avatar
D_Hall
Donating Member
Donating Member
 
Posts: 1759
Joined: Thu Feb 07, 2008 7:37 pm
Location: SoCal
Reputation: 6

Unread postAuthor: spudamine » Sat Feb 13, 2010 2:51 pm

I don't know where you are, but if you're in the UK such fittings are readily available, halfway down thispage for instance (called a running BSP parallel)
there's also a version threaded on the inside which is insanely useful for making valves.

I've always wondered, if sniper is inaccurate as it refers to the role, and sniper rifle is only correct if you have a rifled barrel, what the hell should we call, er 'snipers'?
  • 0

User avatar
spudamine
Sergeant Major
Sergeant Major
 
Posts: 184
Joined: Sun Nov 23, 2008 2:47 pm
Reputation: 0

Unread postAuthor: D_Hall » Sat Feb 13, 2010 2:57 pm

spudamine wrote:I've always wondered, if sniper is inaccurate as it refers to the role, and sniper rifle is only correct if you have a rifled barrel, what the hell should we call, er 'snipers'?

Heck, I've got a question for ya.... WTF is a 'sniper'? I've never been able to figure out what people around here are talking about when they say they're buliding a 'sniper.' ...Looks like just another spud gun to me.
  • 0

Simulation geek (GGDT / HGDT) and designer of Vera.
User avatar
D_Hall
Donating Member
Donating Member
 
Posts: 1759
Joined: Thu Feb 07, 2008 7:37 pm
Location: SoCal
Reputation: 6

Unread postAuthor: jeepkahn » Sat Feb 13, 2010 3:28 pm

The term sniper was first attested in 1824 in the sense of the word "sharpshooter".[2] The verb "to snipe" originated in the 1770s among soldiers in British India where a hunter skilled enough to kill the elusive snipe was dubbed a "sniper".[2]


LOL... But I believe they're just trying to say "A more precise/accurate spudgun than your typical s&p" but with fewer words... It's all relative...
  • 0

My Cannons can be found by clicking the following link.
http://www.spudfiles.com/forums/viewtop ... tml#256896

jeepkahn
Colonel
Colonel
 
Posts: 747
Joined: Fri Jan 09, 2009 1:11 pm
Location: Triad, NC, USA
Reputation: 0

Unread postAuthor: MrCrowley » Sat Feb 13, 2010 5:18 pm

I know I can buy threaded tube like that in NZ. Any major hardware store sells it in usually 15mm and 20mm diameters from about 15cm-30cm long. If I want a shorter piece, I just cut it from the longer piece and I haven't had any problems using it like that.
  • 0

User avatar
MrCrowley
Moderator
Moderator
 
Posts: 10207
Joined: Fri Jun 23, 2006 10:42 pm
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Country: New Zealand (nz)
Reputation: 4

Unread postAuthor: Crna Legija » Sat Feb 13, 2010 8:58 pm

I have seen them at bunnings is australia, i used it to hold my piston on the gun i posted not that long ago
  • 0

'' To alcohol... The cause of, and solution to, all of life's problems.”
--Homer Simpson

Add me on ps3: wannafuk, 8/11/11 cant wait
User avatar
Crna Legija
Major General
Major General
 
Posts: 2333
Joined: Sun Jul 20, 2008 5:14 am
Location: australia
Reputation: 0

Return to Pneumatic Cannon Discussion

Who is online

Registered users: Bing [Bot], Google [Bot], Google Adsense [Bot], MSNbot Media, Yahoo [Bot]

Reputation System ©'