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Which Pressure Reg Do I Need?

Post questions and info about pneumatic (compressed gas) powered cannons here. This includes discussion about valves, pipe types, compressors, alternate gas setups, and anything else relevant.
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Which Pressure Reg Do I Need?

Unread postAuthor: Tantum » Fri Jun 11, 2010 10:14 pm

Hey, guys. I had some question about air pressure regulators.

I've spent a couple of hours today researching air regulators, but I still can't figure out what what I'm looking for is called. I need a pressure regulator that, when the downstream pressure has been maxed out, closes itself and doesn't vent excess upstream pressure or continue to push it downstream. I think this is what relieving regulators do, so do I need a non-relieving one?

Also, if you know of any affordable reg's that fit the criteria, I'd love some links. But really I just need to know the type of reg I'm looking for.

PS: This is for a tank at about 150 to 200 PSI that fills a low pressure gun.
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Unread postAuthor: Technician1002 » Fri Jun 11, 2010 10:20 pm

Most regs do this. The relieving one is one that if the downstream is shut off and you try to adjust it back to a low pressure, it will vent the down stream pressure for you. Simply use any pressure regulator made for an air compressor and you will be fine.

A welding regulator does not do this. If you shut off the torch and then adjust the regulator to zero, the pressure will remain in the hose until you vent it at the torch. This prevents a dangerous fuel or oxygen vent at the tanks. A welding regulator has to be adjusted while using gas because of this.

I hope this helps.
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Unread postAuthor: Tantum » Fri Jun 11, 2010 11:01 pm

Thank you. This helps immensely. I had a feeling it was something simple that I just wasn't getting.
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Unread postAuthor: Tantum » Sun Jun 27, 2010 3:12 pm

Sorry for the necro, but I just wanted to clarify. Something like this will work for my desired application?

http://cgi.ebay.com/MINI-INLINE-PNEUMAT ... 4148ab45b8
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Unread postAuthor: Lockednloaded » Sun Jun 27, 2010 3:38 pm

thats not a regulator, thats just a flow control valve with a gauge. it is basically just a BV that can be set precisely at a certain degree
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Unread postAuthor: POLAND_SPUD » Sun Jun 27, 2010 3:42 pm

Nope, that's a real regulator
I can't tell if it is relieving or not... there is no info there
I suggest sending an email to the guy selling them
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Unread postAuthor: Technician1002 » Sun Jun 27, 2010 4:58 pm

Do you need a relieving regulator? Does it matter? Unless you have an application that requires the down stream pressure to drop when the regulator is adjusted down while there is no draw on the regulator, either will work fine. Both stop the flow when the downstream demand is shut off. Both can adjust down while there is downstream demand for flow. Only one vents and drops the pressure when there is no downstream flow while it is adjusted down. If you need a video of both types, I can produce one and post it on you tube later this week.

My welding regulators don't relieve and the down stream static pressure will remain in the line as I adjust the regulator to zero. The static pressure remains until I open a downstream valve and drop the static pressure.

My air compressor will relieve the downstream pressure as I adjust the regulator down even with the downstream demand shut off.

Do you need a relieving regulator? Can you manually open a valve downstream to adjust a non relieving regulator?
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Unread postAuthor: Tantum » Mon Jun 28, 2010 1:40 am

I don't need it be relieving. Downstream pressure will be filling the firing valve, and there's no reason for me to need the ability to change pressure settings with the firing chamber pressurized.
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Unread postAuthor: POLAND_SPUD » Mon Jun 28, 2010 1:48 am

well AFAIK there is no difference between the two types as far as price is concerned

anyway for your needs both a relieving and a non-relieving reg will work just fine
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