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lacquer thinner with pvc

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lacquer thinner with pvc

Unread postAuthor: Hubb » Sat Sep 08, 2007 3:23 am

I was reading an article in the archives about a test one conducted for gasoline vs. pvc. (http://www.spudfiles.com/spudtech_archive/viewtopic.php?t=7896)

In the article, the person used lacquer thinner as a substance to test against the gasoline. The lacquer soaked into the pvc and softened it.

My question is, could lacquer thinner be used to make sheet pvc from pieces of pipe, or does the lacquer thinner soak into the pvc, incapable of being removed?
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Unread postAuthor: jimmy101 » Sat Sep 08, 2007 11:58 am

Well, since lacquer thinner in its normal use does eventually evaporate completely I would think it would work as a solvent for dissolving and recasting PVC.

IIRC, lacquer thinner is one of those solvents with special disposal problems. A rag soaked in lacquer thinner heats up as it dries. Spontaneous combustion is a possibility.

I would think the best solvent for PVC would be one of the components of PVC cement; MEK, THF or Cyclohexanone. MEK is usually available with the paint solvents in a well equipped hardware store.

All that being said, I kind of doubt you can recast PVC by dissolving it in anything then letting the solvent evaporate. I suspect the result would be too soft to be of any real use. Easy enough to test though, dump some PVC glue onto something and let it dry. How strong is the resulting lump of PVC?

I would think your best bet for recasting PVC would be to melt it.
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Unread postAuthor: SpudBlaster15 » Sun Sep 09, 2007 11:16 am

Jimmy, I am getting the impression that he does not want to completely dissolve the pipe and re-cast it, but instead use the lacquer thinner to soften the pipe, thus allowing him to flatten it into sheets. If this is the case, it should work fine, but heating the pipe in an oven, then flattening it and letting it cool just seems so much easier.
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Unread postAuthor: Hubb » Sun Sep 09, 2007 4:18 pm

Yeah, spudblaster has the right idea. I'm pretty sure oven heating the pipe would be easier and faster. I was just curious if it would actually work after seeing that article. I will try and see.
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