Login    Register
User Information
Username:
Password:
We are a free and open
community, all are welcome.
Click here to Register
Sponsored
Who is online

In total there are 70 users online :: 5 registered, 0 hidden and 65 guests


Most users ever online was 155 on Mon Aug 15, 2016 1:40 am

Registered users: Bing [Bot], Google [Bot], Google Adsense [Bot], MSNbot Media, Yahoo [Bot] based on users active over the past 5 minutes

The Team
Administrators
Global Moderators
global_moderators.png CS

A question for all you soldering experts

A place to ask general spud cannon related questions.
Sponsored 
  • Author
    Message

A question for all you soldering experts

Unread postAuthor: skyjive » Fri Jul 17, 2009 1:18 pm

If I have a some copper fittings soldered together, and I melt the solder and pull them apart, can I solder them together again in a different way and use them safely as if they were being soldered for the first time?
  • 0

User avatar
skyjive
Master Sergeant
Master Sergeant
 
Posts: 163
Joined: Mon May 26, 2008 3:52 pm
Reputation: 0

Unread postAuthor: colty-bear » Fri Jul 17, 2009 1:25 pm

try just melting the old wire then go over it again
  • 0

My first 300 spud bux.
User avatar
colty-bear
1st Lieutenant
1st Lieutenant
 
Posts: 250
Joined: Tue Feb 24, 2009 10:24 pm
Reputation: 0

Unread postAuthor: mark.f » Fri Jul 17, 2009 1:26 pm

Not really.

Unless you sand all the surfaces back to bare metal, and at the same time don't remove too much material to where the clearances widen enough to inhibit the capillary action while soldering.

When I muck up a joint, I just rebuy the parts. It's not worth the work and uneasiness.
  • 0

User avatar
mark.f
Donating Member
Donating Member
 
Posts: 3464
Joined: Sat May 06, 2006 11:18 am
Country: United States (us)
Reputation: 21

Unread postAuthor: UKSGC » Fri Jul 17, 2009 2:02 pm

Mark thats not true at all. Heat it until it parts then simply rub the old solder down enough to get the fittings back on, reflux and go again.
I dont wish to wet anyone bonfire but I have been soldering for about 25 years.
  • 0


UKSGC
Specialist
Specialist
 
Posts: 42
Joined: Sun Jan 21, 2007 5:17 pm
Location: Cornwall UK
Reputation: 0

Unread postAuthor: mark.f » Fri Jul 17, 2009 2:20 pm

Wouldn't metling the old solder off (leaving the parts 'tinned') be better than simply sanding them down a bit?

Not arguing, just wondering.
  • 0

User avatar
mark.f
Donating Member
Donating Member
 
Posts: 3464
Joined: Sat May 06, 2006 11:18 am
Country: United States (us)
Reputation: 21

Unread postAuthor: jrrdw » Fri Jul 17, 2009 3:42 pm

UKSGC wrote:Mark thats not true at all. Heat it until it parts then simply rub the old solder down enough to get the fittings back on, reflux and go again.
I dont wish to wet anyone bonfire but I have been soldering for about 25 years.


Important keyword highlighted in red.
  • 0

When life gives you lemons...throw them back they suck!
User avatar
jrrdw
Donating Moderator
Donating Moderator
 
Posts: 6538
Joined: Wed Nov 16, 2005 5:11 pm
Location: Maryland
Country: United States (us)
Reputation: 25

Unread postAuthor: Technician1002 » Sat Jul 18, 2009 6:37 pm

jrrdw wrote:
UKSGC wrote:Mark thats not true at all. Heat it until it parts then simply rub the old solder down enough to get the fittings back on, reflux and go again.
I dont wish to wet anyone bonfire but I have been soldering for about 25 years.


Important keyword highlighted in red.


I agree, Flux is required to crust and float off oxidized solder. I have re-used copper parts with no issues.

Instead of sanding the parts to remove excess amounts of the old solder, just heat the solder to the flowing point and quickly wipe it off with a damp rag. This removes the excess solder and the oxidized solder leaving a nice shiny tinned surface. Flux, assemble and solder. Use a cotton rag, not anything synthetic that will melt.
  • 0

User avatar
Technician1002
Chief of Staff
Chief of Staff
 
Posts: 5190
Joined: Sat Apr 04, 2009 11:10 am
Reputation: 14

Sponsored

Sponsor
 


Unread postAuthor: cdheller » Sun Jul 19, 2009 12:18 pm

for what its worth

although you have to heat both parts ftg and pipe it helps to throw a little more heat on the pipe .

smacking or knocking off the fitting in a strait line is usually a lot less work than pulling apart.

keep an eye on your heat it's way too easy to make every thing soft.

a flux brush works good to swipe the excess solder from the inside of the fitting ,outside of pipe too.

a dry rag works better than a wet rag in a couple of ways ..more time to get all solder off before solder hardens ,wicks some also
  • 0

"A lot of what is taken for engineering fact is nothing more than somebody`s opinion when you dig into it far enough."
Henry "Smokey" Yunick, 1923-2001
User avatar
cdheller
Donating Member
Donating Member
 
Posts: 126
Joined: Wed Oct 05, 2005 5:30 pm
Location: Austin Texas
Reputation: 0

Return to General Spud Cannon Related

Who is online

Registered users: Bing [Bot], Google [Bot], Google Adsense [Bot], MSNbot Media, Yahoo [Bot]

Reputation System ©'