Login    Register
User Information
Username:
Password:
We are a free and open
community, all are welcome.
Click here to Register
Sponsored
Who is online

In total there are 49 users online :: 4 registered, 0 hidden and 45 guests


Most users ever online was 155 on Mon Aug 15, 2016 1:40 am

Registered users: Bing [Bot], Google [Bot], Google Adsense [Bot], Yahoo [Bot] based on users active over the past 5 minutes

The Team
Administrators
Global Moderators
global_moderators.png CS

Solvent Welding Course Recommended For ALL

A place to ask general spud cannon related questions.
Sponsored 
  • Author
    Message

Unread postAuthor: Selador » Thu Dec 02, 2010 4:52 pm

Technician1002 wrote:If the code does not require sanding, the inspector can't require it.


If you've done any appreciable amount of residential building or remodeling, (and it sounds like you have), then you know that statement is not true.

The inspector can fail you for any reason they want.

Challenging them is on your dime.

For instance, the inspector -could- fail you because they found a booger on a 2x4 stud near the plumbing.

In the case of the booger, the challenge is going to be quick. The inspector's boss is probably going to have a talk with the inspector, toot-sweet. (or else the inspector was expecting a bribe, and now you have to bribe both inspector and boss. LOL)

But the case of not finding evidence of sanding, (Even if it is not specifically required in the code), is in more of a grey area. And one where the boss is more likely to back his inspector. (Whether he agrees or not.)

That one will cost you, to challenge...

Technician1002 wrote:Knowing the code can prevent an inspector from flunking the job.


That, it can. And just as in your experience, knowing the code has stood me well, over the years, as well.

But it is no guarantee...

~~~

But we have taken the thread off course.

Your earlier post about just scoring the surface, has me wondering if that is why OATEY makes a brush tool that scores the inside of a fitting, and the outside of a pipe... Instead of sanding accessories for the purpose. (Scoring being enough. Sanding being maybe too much.)
  • 0

If you can't fix it, you don't own it.

Selador
2nd Lieutenant
2nd Lieutenant
 
Posts: 213
Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2010 9:44 pm
Reputation: 0

Unread postAuthor: Technician1002 » Thu Dec 02, 2010 5:04 pm

Your earlier post about just scoring the surface, has me wondering if that is why OATEY makes a brush tool that scores the inside of a fitting, and the outside of a pipe... Instead of sanding accessories for the purpose.


Congratulations on the move up the knowledge ladder. You are now beginning to understand the purpose and use of primer. Now the scoring tool makes sense. Something I didn't mention earlier, the scoring reduces the rate of evaporation of the primer off the surface. It holds it in place longer.
  • 0

User avatar
Technician1002
Chief of Staff
Chief of Staff
 
Posts: 5190
Joined: Sat Apr 04, 2009 11:10 am
Reputation: 14

Previous

Return to General Spud Cannon Related

Who is online

Registered users: Bing [Bot], Google [Bot], Google Adsense [Bot], Yahoo [Bot]

Reputation System ©'