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different gas compression?

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different gas compression?

Unread postAuthor: haulinick » Fri Oct 06, 2006 11:35 pm

I was thinking, don't different kinds of gases compress easier or harder than others? The thought came when I heard the difference between putting water pressure in pipe and air. They exert the same force but since air compressers more its more "explosive" if the pipe gives. Now correct me if I'm wrong on any of this, but wouldn't different gases compress differently like nitrogen, co2, etc.?
If so would using a gas that compresses more at the same psi rating be more effective when released through a valve??
I'm sorry ahead of time if I am confusing. I'm not really sure how to explain this well.
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Unread postAuthor: rna_duelers » Sat Oct 07, 2006 5:41 am

Well the lighter the gas the faster it moves(from compressed to decompressed state).But im not sure what you are trying to get across.But CO2 i belive has a maximum speed velocity of .8mach and hydrogen and helium have much higher capable speeds then normal air which is full of nitrogen.
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Unread postAuthor: mark.f » Sat Oct 07, 2006 5:58 am

He's asking whether different gasses compress any differently.

Take it this way: water barely compresses before it's up to 100 PSI, while gases compress seemingly forever until they're finally up to 100 PSI.
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Unread postAuthor: haulinick » Sat Oct 07, 2006 1:30 pm

ya, duelers got it i think. I think what i was getting at is the speed at which the gas decompresses. I was wondering if co2 or some other type of gas will decompress faster than air even if they are at the same psi.
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Unread postAuthor: boilingleadbath » Sat Oct 07, 2006 6:15 pm

The amount of energy stored in the gas is essentialy the same at low pressures.
Now, if you build a cannon that operates at several thousand PSI, you might notice a difference. (or if you use exotic gasses, I geuss)

Now, light gasses (helium, hydrogen) can move faster than air, and could expell the shrapnel (or a projectile) a tad faster. The converse applies for heavy gasses, like CO2 or radon or something.
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