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PostPosted: Thu Oct 26, 2006 9:02 pm
by SpudStuff
And how would you get it in the chamber?

PostPosted: Thu Oct 26, 2006 9:22 pm
by benstern
Hmmm... good point. The only hole in the cylinder would be the threaded hole for the valve. ~2"
at the pressures I want to reach, welding is out of the question. This basically leaves one option available. Joel's Chambah Chain!
<img src="http://spudtech.com/images/etc/chambahchain.jpg"/>

PostPosted: Thu Oct 26, 2006 9:24 pm
by SpudStuff
Or...
Pennies in the chamber!

PostPosted: Thu Oct 26, 2006 11:45 pm
by SpudMonster
<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="tahoma,verdana,arial" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote">Originally posted by SpudStuff
[br]Or...
Pennies in the chamber!
<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

Good luck shaking a chamber that big...

PostPosted: Thu Oct 26, 2006 11:49 pm
by SpudStuff
Use steel BBs and a magnet? The chamber is Al right?

PostPosted: Fri Oct 27, 2006 12:05 am
by sgort87
I really think shaking such a thing, especially by hand, is a bad bad thing.

PostPosted: Fri Oct 27, 2006 8:45 am
by SpudStuff
Throw a bunch of thoes micro fans in all wired together.

PostPosted: Fri Oct 27, 2006 4:58 pm
by Darth Tater
<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="tahoma,verdana,arial" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote">Originally posted by SpudStuff
[br]Throw a bunch of thoes micro fans in all wired together.
<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

you know, i think he's on to something.

build a small device, that fits into the opening, battery powered, and basically have it "jump around" like those little balls at the toy store that move on their own kinda thing... except this will move more rapidly and have little "fins" on it to help move air...


of course, at a 20x mix, i think there will be enough compressed air going in to mix the fuel/air just fine.

PostPosted: Fri Oct 27, 2006 5:17 pm
by sgort87
Just wondering, how are you getting this to 280 psi?

PostPosted: Wed Nov 01, 2006 10:10 pm
by BillyBobJoe
<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="tahoma,verdana,arial" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote">Originally posted by GalFisk
[br]For air, and gaps on the order of a millimeter, the breakdown is roughly a linear function of the gap length: V = 30pd + 1.35 kV, where d is in centimeters, and p is in atmospheres.
(<a href="http://home.earthlink.net/~jimlux/hv/paschen.htm">source</a>)
<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

I've been looking for this type of equation for a long time - Thanks!

But I'm confused as to what the V equals? Voltage in volts or kilovolts? Letts assume volts and I need to find how much of a gap at 7.48 atm (110 PSI) is needed for 7000 volts. So 7000=30(7.48)d+1.35 kv

d= 25.2cm

A 25 cm gap for 7,000 volts at 110 PSI? I don't think so - what am I doing wrong? I know this only works with gaps around 1 mm, but I should be getting a gap around 1 mm.

EDIT - Found this from the original site "Typically, the Townsend mechanism (and by extension Paschen's law) apply at pd products less than 1000 torr cm, or gaps around a centimeter at one atmosphere."

One atmosphere is about 760 torr, so this is pretty much useless? But still, it predicts a 1 cm gap for 1380 volts at one atmosphere. Definitely not right and it's still within the constraints of the equation. 'Effin math . . .