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Unread postPosted: Thu Sep 06, 2007 10:50 pm
Author: Fnord
I know :) , I've actually read most of maddox's articles before.

yar.

Unread postPosted: Thu Sep 06, 2007 10:56 pm
Author: MrCrowley
Haha check this out:

Image
Maddox wrote:I don't know what this graph means, but I'm pretty sure it's proof that Jews were involved.

Unread postPosted: Thu Sep 06, 2007 11:56 pm
Author: Spedy
I'd guess that using Al plating in the outer hull would help, Al always has a very tough micron-thin oxide layer protecting the rest of the metal. Al should stand up to sea water I think.

Unread postPosted: Fri Sep 07, 2007 12:05 am
Author: MrCrowley
But it would cost a fortune, the question was for a cheap way to do it.

Unread postPosted: Fri Sep 07, 2007 3:47 am
Author: clide
Maddox kicks so much ass. That is exactly the kind of science and logic that these conspiracy nuts use. I've seen it before, but I LMAO every time I see it.

Anyway back on topic. Aluminum is subject to pitting corrosion in the presence of the chloride ion, so it will corrode in sea water.

Unread postPosted: Fri Sep 07, 2007 3:50 am
Author: jackssmirkingrevenge
clide wrote:Maddox kicks so much ass. That is exactly the kind of science and logic that these conspiracy nuts use. I've seen it before, but I LMAO every time I see it.


This has got to be my favourite :D

Re: interesting science question

Unread postPosted: Fri Sep 07, 2007 4:10 am
Author: Novacastrian
mopherman wrote:well, my science homework had an interestion question today so i thought i would share it with you.

How would you rust proof a large sea-bearing ship? cheaply


Make it out of wood.

Re: interesting science question

Unread postPosted: Fri Sep 07, 2007 6:49 am
Author: frankrede
Novacastrian wrote:
mopherman wrote:well, my science homework had an interestion question today so i thought i would share it with you.

How would you rust proof a large sea-bearing ship? cheaply


Make it out of wood.
BINGO!

Re: interesting science question

Unread postPosted: Fri Sep 07, 2007 7:20 am
Author: paaiyan
frankrede wrote:
Novacastrian wrote:
mopherman wrote:well, my science homework had an interestion question today so i thought i would share it with you.

How would you rust proof a large sea-bearing ship? cheaply


Make it out of wood.
BINGO!


Man, I feel like an idiot now...

Re: interesting science question

Unread postPosted: Fri Sep 07, 2007 11:01 am
Author: jimmy101
mopherman wrote:well, my science homework had an interestion question today so i thought i would share it with you.

How would you rust proof a large sea-bearing ship? cheaply

Damn, that would be an awful big ship if it is big enough to carry a sea!

I suppose you meant a "sea-going" ship?

The "cheaply" part is the most important part of the question. In this case "cheaply" translates to "how it is actually done in practice" since "in practice" is basically the same as "cheaply".

Like everyone else said, ya paint it and attach sacrificial electrodes. It is the only cheap solution.

Unread postPosted: Sat Sep 08, 2007 9:37 pm
Author: Pilgrimman
http://www.thebestpageintheuniverse.net/c.cgi?u=chappelle

My favorite Maddox. I've read The Alphabet of Manliness! Has anyone else? It rules!

On topic... A zinc coating, like others suggested, would be a smart move. I don't know how expensive Zinc is, but you only need to apply to about 15/1000" thick coating, and run an electric current through it.

Re: interesting science question

Unread postPosted: Sun Sep 09, 2007 1:59 pm
Author: frankrede
jimmy101 wrote:
mopherman wrote:well, my science homework had an interestion question today so i thought i would share it with you.

How would you rust proof a large sea-bearing ship? cheaply

Damn, that would be an awful big ship if it is big enough to carry a sea!

I suppose you meant a "sea-going" ship?

The "cheaply" part is the most important part of the question. In this case "cheaply" translates to "how it is actually done in practice" since "in practice" is basically the same as "cheaply".

Like everyone else said, ya paint it and attach sacrificial electrodes. It is the only cheap solution.

But those would eventually wear out?
and over time they would need to be replaced, while a wood ship would never rust, seeing that it isn't made of metal.

Re: interesting science question

Unread postPosted: Sun Sep 09, 2007 2:36 pm
Author: jimmy101
frankrede wrote:
jimmy101 wrote:
mopherman wrote:well, my science homework had an interestion question today so i thought i would share it with you.

How would you rust proof a large sea-bearing ship? cheaply

Damn, that would be an awful big ship if it is big enough to carry a sea!

I suppose you meant a "sea-going" ship?

The "cheaply" part is the most important part of the question. In this case "cheaply" translates to "how it is actually done in practice" since "in practice" is basically the same as "cheaply".

Like everyone else said, ya paint it and attach sacrificial electrodes. It is the only cheap solution.

But those would eventually wear out?
and over time they would need to be replaced, while a wood ship would never rust, seeing that it isn't made of metal.

Nope, wood sucks as a building material. How many modern commercial ships are being built out of wood?

Wood rots in water. Untreated wood looses almost all of what little strength it has after submersion in water for just a few weeks.

Worms, and other organisms, eat wood.

How do you hold the wood in place? Wooden pegs? Any type of metal fastener will be very difficult to protect since most of the fastener is inaccessible.

So, the wood won't rust but it'll fail for a dozen other reasons long before a metal hull would.

With proper paint and a sacrificial electrode a steel hull ship will last essentially forever.

The next best materials to use for the hull of a large ship, after metals, is probably concrete, then fiberglass or other plastics.

Unread postPosted: Sun Sep 09, 2007 6:05 pm
Author: sandman

Unread postPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2007 10:43 am
Author: jimmy101
Sandman, ya, if it is OK if the ship melts within a year or two :D

Pykrete can be easily formed using water and any porous and fibrous material, such as shredded paper or sawdust. Anything that can be molded with this wet pulp will freeze and become strong and non-brittle.

Course they leave out one minor detail. It takes a lot of energy to freeze water. To freeze lots of water takes a huge amount of energy.

The only pratical way I can think of to freeze a boat size volume of water + saw dust would be to do it in a place where the ambient temperature is well below freezing. You would also need a source of pure water, salt water would be almost impossible to freeze.

The same factors that make Pykrete slow to melt also make it slow to freeze. So, WAG suggests that to make a boat that won't melt for a year will take at least a year to freeze in the first place.