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silicon as piston

Unread postPosted: Fri Apr 04, 2008 5:48 pm
Author: Pilgor
has anybody ever tried to use silicon as a piston, the kind you use to seal windows with. It is rubbery, easier on the housing. I am not sure how strong it is, not sure if it will rip in half after first fire.

I am always looking for a new piston material that is really cheap and easy to cast. Post new piston material ideas!!

Unread postPosted: Fri Apr 04, 2008 6:02 pm
Author: MaxuS the 2nd
It would almost certainly deform horribly after a while and most likely rip on the first go.

Unread postPosted: Fri Apr 04, 2008 6:04 pm
Author: bigbob12345
I once tried it as a sealing face and didnt work at all
probably because it wasnt smooth but...

Unread postPosted: Fri Apr 04, 2008 7:12 pm
Author: Hubb
I know Liquid Nails doesn't work too good. Lucy for me, my $5 tube was just for an experimental 1" piston, which means I had more left. Don't use it.

Unread postPosted: Sat Apr 05, 2008 12:46 am
Author: SpudMonster
It's siliconE. Note the E. See it? Silicon and silicone are two entirely different materials. Silicone is for fake tits. Silicon is for computer chips.

Also, worship the search button.

Unread postPosted: Sat Apr 05, 2008 8:52 am
Author: Hubb
Did you have to rape him becuase of the E? That's being a little anal, don't you think. He asked a legit question.

Unread postPosted: Sat Apr 05, 2008 9:50 am
Author: bluerussetboy
SpudMonster wrote:It's siliconE. Note the E. See it? Silicon and silicone are two entirely different materials. Silicone is for fake tits. Silicon is for computer chips.

Also, worship the search button.


Had you actually used Google before you posted your ever so gentle 'rape' of Pilgor you might have found actual information other than the 'E' difference.

Pilgor:
Silicon is the second most abundant element in the earth's crust. Wikipedia will tell you
In the form of silica and silicates, silicon forms useful glasses, cements, and ceramics.

This should tell you that silicon is not suited all that well for pistons due to it's brittleness.
Further reading should help with silicones.
The second largest application of silicon (about 40% of world consumption) is as a raw material in the production of silicones, compounds containing silicon-oxygen and silicon-carbon bonds that have the capability to acting as bonding intermediates between glass and organic compounds, and to form polymers with useful properties such as impermeability to water, flexibility and resistance to chemical attack. Silicones are used in waterproofing treatments, moulding compounds and mould-release agents, mechanical seals, high temperature greases and waxes, caulking compounds and even in applications as diverse as breast implants, explosives and pyrotechnics.[3]

* Construction: Silicon dioxide or silica in the form of sand and clay is an important ingredient of concrete and brick and is also used to produce Portland cement.
* Pottery/Enamel is a refractory material used in high-temperature material production and its silicates are used in making enamels and pottery.
* Glass: Silica from sand is a principal component of glass. Glass can be made into a great variety of shapes and with many different physical properties. Silica is used as a base material to make window glass, containers, insulators, and many other useful objects.
* Abrasives: Silicon carbide is one of the most important abrasives.
* Silly Putty was originally made by adding boric acid to silicone oil. Now name-brand Silly Putty also contains significant amounts of elemental silicon. (Silicon binds to the silicone and allows the material to bounce 20% higher.)


This should tell you silicones are either too brittle or unable to hold form consistently, thus making them poor for use as pistons.

Unread postPosted: Sun Apr 06, 2008 12:17 am
Author: SpudMonster
bluerussetboy wrote:
SpudMonster wrote:It's siliconE. Note the E. See it? Silicon and silicone are two entirely different materials. Silicone is for fake tits. Silicon is for computer chips.

Also, worship the search button.


Had you actually used Google before you posted your ever so gentle 'rape' of Pilgor you might have found actual information other than the 'E' difference.

Pilgor:
Silicon is the second most abundant element in the earth's crust. Wikipedia will tell you
In the form of silica and silicates, silicon forms useful glasses, cements, and ceramics.

This should tell you that silicon is not suited all that well for pistons due to it's brittleness.
Further reading should help with silicones.
The second largest application of silicon (about 40% of world consumption) is as a raw material in the production of silicones, compounds containing silicon-oxygen and silicon-carbon bonds that have the capability to acting as bonding intermediates between glass and organic compounds, and to form polymers with useful properties such as impermeability to water, flexibility and resistance to chemical attack. Silicones are used in waterproofing treatments, moulding compounds and mould-release agents, mechanical seals, high temperature greases and waxes, caulking compounds and even in applications as diverse as breast implants, explosives and pyrotechnics.[3]

* Construction: Silicon dioxide or silica in the form of sand and clay is an important ingredient of concrete and brick and is also used to produce Portland cement.
* Pottery/Enamel is a refractory material used in high-temperature material production and its silicates are used in making enamels and pottery.
* Glass: Silica from sand is a principal component of glass. Glass can be made into a great variety of shapes and with many different physical properties. Silica is used as a base material to make window glass, containers, insulators, and many other useful objects.
* Abrasives: Silicon carbide is one of the most important abrasives.
* Silly Putty was originally made by adding boric acid to silicone oil. Now name-brand Silly Putty also contains significant amounts of elemental silicon. (Silicon binds to the silicone and allows the material to bounce 20% higher.)


This should tell you silicones are either too brittle or unable to hold form consistently, thus making them poor for use as pistons.


Please forgive me for not reiterating what the three replies before mine said. Also, why the hell are you bitching at me for not posting the material properties of silicon and silicone? I simply pointed out a pretty significant spelling error in the OP.