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Unread postPosted: Thu Nov 13, 2008 7:35 pm
Author: MrCrowley
_Fnord wrote:Yes. I think it was MrCrowley who had a 45* elbow blow up for no apparent reason. There have been various other failures here and there, but most of them can be attributed to recoil stresses on barrel-to-chamber fittings. This is the only case I can think of where it wasn't the cause.

Yup it 'twas I. I know I glued and primed it correctly so I lay blame on rapid (de)compression (stress on the fittings) and possbily bad glue. It was getting close to it's use-by date but was still the same thickness (hadn't dried out from leaving it exposed).

It has made me a little more careful, I always wear safety glasses when firing and filling the cannon.

Unread postPosted: Thu Nov 20, 2008 1:26 pm
Author: Biopyro
Who would have guessed there was a test of durability from impact all along. Weird no-one had ever found this.
Test video

Unread postPosted: Thu Nov 20, 2008 2:38 pm
Author: Radiation
MrCrowley the elbow blow out, was it on a pneumatic or combustion? From what I'm gathering from this thread it is the constant pressure of a pneumatic that seems to be the main source of blowouts. A standard properly built combustion gun does not seem to be a culprit in these blowouts, though I am not saying any design is 100% safe from failure.

Unread postPosted: Thu Nov 20, 2008 2:56 pm
Author: MrCrowley
Radiation wrote:MrCrowley the elbow blow out, was it on a pneumatic or combustion? From what I'm gathering from this thread it is the constant pressure of a pneumatic that seems to be the main source of blowouts. A standard properly built combustion gun does not seem to be a culprit in these blowouts, though I am not saying any design is 100% safe from failure.

Pneumatic, around 110PSI.

I would think if you built your combustion properly, it should never blow up. The firing rate is probably slower then that of a pneumatic and the pressure below 100psi (on an advanced combustion).