"In the world of spuds today"

A place for general potato gun questions and discussions.
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jackssmirkingrevenge
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Wed Jan 22, 2020 11:57 am

mrfoo wrote:
Mon Jan 20, 2020 2:26 pm
As for stripdowns, I've never had a piece of chinese gear that wasn't chock full of grinding dust. Just saying, like.
Removed the bolts from the top of the headstock but it wouldn't budge, there appears to be some sealant or something... looks like some frequent initial oil changes are going to have to do.
hectmarr wrote:You have to make many weapons, because this field is long and short life
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mrfoo
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Fri Jan 24, 2020 3:08 am

Oil changes in the headstock , check. I wouldn't try tearing the headstock down unless you're replacing the bearings, which will be el-cheapo versions. Replacing them with "good" bearings is almost certainly not cost-effective. Change the oil regularly, flush out all the crap.

What I'd be more worried about are the slides. On, and I don't want to come across as condescending here, "quality" machine tools, all the sliding surfaces are ground to size, and then hand-scraped to high tolerance. That's why my 1949 Schaublin still holds 1/100mm tolerances. However, that skilled manual intervention comes with a cost, in both time and monetary terms, and it's not a cost that can be borne when you're punting out thousands of lathes at 800$ (or more, given that yours is somewhat larger than the classic "mini lathe"). Chinese machine tools, at least the "affordable" ones are ground, and then slapped together. Much of the grinding happens *on the machine*. The cleanup and final finishing simply doesn't happen, as can be witnessed by the shocking number of non-deburred edges on new Chinese tooling. In most cases, the mating surfaces don't mate perfectly (which is bad for long-term accuracy, as the high points will wear off, in short order and a non uniform fashion, leaving slop all over the place), and are usually full of grinding dust, which mixes with your oil to form grinding paste...

Oh, and the chuck. Tear down and clean the chuck.

I'm in no way slamming chinese machines here. It's the profit-driven functional dive to the bottom, which as a very positive side effect means that people like you and I can now afford to buy machines that would have been way out of our price range before, which causes this, and those machines are currently coming from China. But you have to understand that a machine tool at an affordable price point must be considered to be "user completion required" if you want it to give, and carry on giving, good results. Or, in the case of a second hand machine, "some repair required".

There's a video out there of a mini lathe teardown by that german guy whose name I forget. He's very OCD in terms of accuracy, but it shows exactly where the corners have been cut.
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jackssmirkingrevenge
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Fri Jan 24, 2020 10:09 am

I couldn't find a port to fill the oil and the manual was no help so I contacted Busy Bee customer service and it turns out it goes through the top, so I'm going to need to take the lid it off anyway.
mrfoo wrote:
Fri Jan 24, 2020 3:08 am
What I'd be more worried about are the slides. On, and I don't want to come across as condescending here, "quality" machine tools, all the sliding surfaces are ground to size, and then hand-scraped to high tolerance. That's why my 1949 Schaublin still holds 1/100mm tolerances. However, that skilled manual intervention comes with a cost, in both time and monetary terms, and it's not a cost that can be borne when you're punting out thousands of lathes at 800$ (or more, given that yours is somewhat larger than the classic "mini lathe"). Chinese machine tools, at least the "affordable" ones are ground, and then slapped together. Much of the grinding happens *on the machine*. The cleanup and final finishing simply doesn't happen, as can be witnessed by the shocking number of non-deburred edges on new Chinese tooling. In most cases, the mating surfaces don't mate perfectly (which is bad for long-term accuracy, as the high points will wear off, in short order and a non uniform fashion, leaving slop all over the place), and are usually full of grinding dust, which mixes with your oil to form grinding paste...
I see where you're coming from, but in this case it seems a little better. After reading all the horror stories I didn't go for the cheapest and the fact that they are branded by an importer who offers a three year warranty then seem to stand by means that they probably put a bit more effort into the product. I can't speak of tolerances yet but the finish seems decent, overall I have high hopes for this thing :)
hectmarr wrote:You have to make many weapons, because this field is long and short life
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Gippeto
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Sat Jan 25, 2020 7:24 pm

that feeling when.jpg
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Unboxing pics of machine tool related"stuff" is mandatory...just sayin. :)
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farcticox1
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Sat Mar 07, 2020 5:53 pm

Bought a Nerf Rival gun, yes paid real money for it :o about as much fun you can have indoors with your clothes on :P 12 round mag, single shot pump action , $36 CAD
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Xamllew
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Sat Mar 07, 2020 9:40 pm

Bought one of the Nerf Rival pistols for my nephew, ended up basically stealing it back because it's fun to plink cans with and the action is pretty cool.
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farcticox1
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Sun Mar 08, 2020 9:41 am

Anybody tried one of these Chronographs, for the price I'm tempted to get one, the large opening will work well for my Nerf guns as well.
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